TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

3 Big Mistakes That CEOs Must Fix To Inspire Employees

Mistakes-CEOs-make-that-cost-employee-motivation

The following is a guest piece by CEO Ben Decker.

Across every business vertical and level, we all tell ourselves little white lies when it comes to communicating: “People tell me I’m pretty good at communicating.” “I don’t need to prep; I can wing it.” “If I say the words, people will get it.”

At the CEO level, these white lies run rampant. After years of working with business leaders, the fact is most CEOs are not inspiring. And oftentimes, they are not even influential.

The good news: All of us can inspire. We just have to tweak our communications approach. Communicating is a learned skill, critical for leadership and motivation – the CEO’s primary task.

Here are the top three mistakes that CEOs make – and how to fix them: Click here to continue reading »”3 Big Mistakes That CEOs Must Fix To Inspire Employees”

Think Inside The Box To Solve Leadership Challenges

Leadership-thinking-inside-the-box

The following is a guest piece by Mike Figliuolo.

The phrase “think outside the box” makes me physically ill. It’s trite and isn’t at all practical. But inside the box? That’s where great leaders go to get more out of their teams. You can too with a simple assessment tool that provides insights as to how to most effectively lead the unique members of your team.

Preface: I’m an idiot. My friend and fellow thoughtLEADERS instructor Victor Prince hoodwinked me into co-authoring a new book: “Lead Inside the Box – How Smart Leaders Guide Their Teams to Exceptional Results“. The premise is you need to evaluate the amount of output you get from a team member and compare that to the amount of time and energy you have to invest in them to get it. We call that second piece “leadership capital.”

The result of those comparisons is the Leadership Matrix (or “the box” for short). Within that matrix, we define behavioral archetypes from Slackers to Rising Stars and everything in between. The real insight lies in practical advice on how to lead those folks to improve their performance.

By understanding the behaviors your team members will demonstrate and how you invest (or don’t invest) your time and effort into them, you’ll get a clearer picture of the 8 archetypical behaviors that can show up in the box. With that understanding, you can begin leading differently which will improve your performance. Those archetypes are as follows: Click here to continue reading »”Think Inside The Box To Solve Leadership Challenges”

Leadership Is About Alignment

Leadership-alignment

The following is a guest piece by Marlene Chism.

There are as many definitions for leadership as there are companies that have leaders, yet at the core, leadership is about alignment. When we hear the word alignment, we think “walking the talk” or acting from integrity. We have all had the experience of observing a leader who doesn’t “walk his talk.” There an incongruity, an imbalance, or lack of agreement in one or more area.

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s definition of alignment is to arrange things so that they form a line or are in proper position: to change something so that it agrees with or matches something else.

Working in and living in alignment is difficult because alignment requires you to make decisions and take actions that are in agreement with many goals, ideas and beliefs, some of which may be in conflict. Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Is About Alignment”

Speak To The Heart To Lead Change

Leading-with-heart

The following is a guest piece by Dianna Booher.

“I’ve sold millions and millions of dollars during my 30 years at IBM, and it never occurred to me that people make their buying decisions based on emotion first, and then justified with logic,” John said to me over dinner a few weeks ago. “But you’re right. As I think back about the various client deals, I can see that. I definitely can see that.

Another case in point.

But more formal, rigorous research shows overwhelmingly that people base buying decisions on emotion, and then support them with logic. In a business setting, a logical argument is expected, of course. Just don’t count on the logical argument to win people over to your way of thinking.

In “The Heart of Change”, John Kotter and Dan Cohen discuss a study they conducted with Deloitte Consulting about the nature of change. The study involved more than 400 interviewees from 130 companies in the United States, Australia, Europe, and South Africa.

Their interpretation of the data? Even in large corporations that focus on very logical approaches to strategy, culture, and analysis of data, change happens because the leaders find a way to help people see problems or solutions in ways that influence their emotions, not just their reasoning.

In my own research for “What More Can I Say: Why Communication Fails and What to Do About It”, executives told me the same things over and over: To lead change, influence others, and gain commitment, speak to the heart.

So what does that mean exactly? Click here to continue reading »”Speak To The Heart To Lead Change”

How Leaders Can Cure A Toxic Workplace

Curing-toxic-workplace

One of the things I enjoy about sharing my writings and insights on leadership is the opportunity it creates to interact with my readers – to hear their stories and what they’ve learned along the way, as well as some of the challenges they are trying to overcome.

Recently, one challenge in particular caught my attention as it was brought forth by both a reader of my leadership blog and by an audience member at a talk I gave last week.  The challenge in question was what do you do if you have to lead a team in a toxic workplace setting? And how can you overcome this to effectively lead your employees?

Given the interest expressed by two different segments of my audience, I want to share some key steps leaders should employ to help cure toxic workplaces and replace them with a more healthy, productive work environment.

Granted, I can’t provide specific steps because every situation is different and comes with its own set of variables and constraints that leaders will have to work with. However, the following measures will nonetheless provide you with both the right perspective and framework to help cure toxic workplaces in your organization.

1. Identify and rally ‘change champions’ in your organization
Now before we can put into action measures to cure a toxic workplace, we need to first understand something about how our brain operates. Neuroscience has shown that our brains are hard-wired to avoid threats in our environment.

Consequently, not only is our brain focused more on looking out for danger than benefits, but the neural signals we get from our different senses are processed first through that lens of whether it’s a good or bad experience before our higher brain functions can help us to create a context for what we’re seeing, hearing, or feeling.

Now it’s important to note here that it’s not just dangerous or harmful events that our brain identifies as threats. Rather, it labels anything that creates ambiguity or uncertainty as a threat and consequently, something we should avoid. And all of this happens subconsciously which is why we may not be able to rationally explain why we fear something, only that we do.

In the case of making changes to your workplace environment, even though Click here to continue reading »”How Leaders Can Cure A Toxic Workplace”

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