TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Are You Creating Value Through Your Leadership?

Creating-value-through-leadership

One of the things I enjoy in writing about leadership is looking out for new insights into how we can become a better leader to those we serve, as well as discovering new examples that can help to illustrate what those measures might look like in action. The most recent example of this came courtesy of my daughter Alya’s dance recital, a show she had to participate in as part of her dance class curriculum.

Now granted, as her father it’s only natural that my focus and attention would be on watching my daughter and being dazzled by her performance. But outside of that typical parental pride, there was one thing that was unmistakable about Alya’s performance – as she danced on that stage, it was clear to everyone that she was having fun.

What was particularly noteworthy about this is that in openly expressing her joy while she danced – irrespective of whether she was the best dancer on stage or not – she actually made her performance that much more enjoyable because her emotional expressiveness drew the audience in. Indeed, after the show, a few of the other parents came up to me to pass along a message to Alya about how much they enjoyed her dance because they appreciated the obvious enthusiasm she brought to the stage.

Hearing these comments made me realize that this is something leaders tend to overlook or fail to take into consideration regarding not only how they communicate to their employees, but also what efforts they make to better relate to those under their care.

More specifically, as leaders, we know the value of the vision or the change initiatives we want to push through our organization. But how many of us can say that our employees see and understand the value behind our collective efforts as well?

In looking at the various studies on employee morale and engagement levels in today’s workplaces, the answer to this question is Click here to continue reading »”Are You Creating Value Through Your Leadership?”

The One Ingredient Your Strengths May Be Missing

Using-confidence-build-strengths

The following is a guest piece by G5 Learning co-founder and author Steven Smith.

Everyone wonders where their true strengths lie. Each year millions devote themselves to discovering those strengths for the first time, and building those strengths into true potential. What most people don’t realize is the level of confidence it takes to get there.

And that limits them.

In spite of decades of clichés and motivational speeches about confidence, true confidence has a radically different set of rules than what tradition tells us. As perhaps the greatest catalyst of human achievement, one that has the capacity to impact everything we do to realize potential, confidence deserves a closer look and undivided attention.

A Choice, Not a Symptom
“Confidence is a choice,” wrote marketing savant Seth Godin, “not a symptom.” Godin’s statement resonates because it’s true. It’s powerful because that truth changes everything. But if confidence is a choice rather than a symptom, then how we make those choices is vital.

It’s not enough to claim confidence as a choice and expect it to appear. If confidence is to be Click here to continue reading »”The One Ingredient Your Strengths May Be Missing”

Accountability At Work – How To Describe The Gap

Managing-gap-in-accountability

The following is a guest piece by Al Switzler.

At some point during the work week, most of us face a gap—the difference between what was expected and what was actually delivered. Gaps, in a nutshell, include violated expectations, broken commitments and bad behaviour. If you’ve felt let down, disappointed or offended, you have experienced a gap. How you deal with gaps makes a huge difference on the quality of relationships and results as a whole.

So how do most respond when faced with a gap? Let’s look at the three options for dealing with gaps and highlight the consequences of each.

1. You see a gap and don’t speak up
You give permission for what’s happening when you remain silent. By saying nothing, you vote for the status quo. Silence is seldom golden; it is almost always interpreted as approval. By not speaking up, you typically act out in other ways.

Your non-verbals, like frowning, rolling your eyes and gossiping, tend to leak out and eventually erode trust and respect. If you let thoughts and emotions build up until you explode, you may say and do things that further hurt the relationship. This leads to the second option. Click here to continue reading »”Accountability At Work – How To Describe The Gap”

Will This Be The Year Leaders Put Employees First?

Leadership-putting-employees-first

As we approach the end of the first month of this new year, many of us are now well under way in implementing our plans and strategies to achieve the goals we’ve mapped out for the next 11 months. In terms of what leaders view as their top goals to achieve this year, a new study reveals some interesting opportunities, and with it, some key obstacles leaders will need to address if they are to help their organization move forward.

In the CEO Challenge 2014 study carried out by The Conference Board, CEOs and presidents from over 1 000 organizations around the world were asked to identify what they saw as the top challenges for their organization. While it wasn’t surprising to see innovation and customer relationships being included in the top 5 challenges, the study’s most revealing finding is how the top challenge for leaders worldwide was Human Capital – namely, how to engage, retain, manage and develop their employees.

In other words, leaders in every region of the world recognize that their employees are the defining factor both for their organization’s ability to achieve their goals this year, and as well as for their overall long-term success. As Rebecca Ray, Senior Vice President, Human Capital at The Conference Board, and co-author of this study points out:

“This emphasis on people-related issues makes perfect sense in a still-uncertain economy. Building a culture that supports engagement, employee training, leadership development, and high performance is something companies can control, and can mean the difference between growing market share and simply surviving in 2014. Moreover, if the focus of individual companies is sustained, Human Capital may well be the engine that revives economic growth.”

This is certainly encouraging news, as it reflects a growing shift from the survivalist/just treading water mindset to one that seeks opportunities for development and growth. However, we do have to be mindful of Click here to continue reading »”Will This Be The Year Leaders Put Employees First?”

A Teenager’s 4 Lessons On How We Can Face Any Challenge

Alya Naseer original illustration

Original illustration by Alya Naseer.

Over the last couple of years, I’ve had the pleasure of hosting a number of talented and respected writers from the field of leadership. But being able to host the following guest writer is definitely a memorable highlight for my blog.

Today’s guest piece is written by my 14-year old daughter, Alya Naseer, who – as those who follow me on the various social media channels already know – published her first illustrated book earlier this year on Amazon – “Don’t Change: A Mother’s Letter Of Love For Her Daughter” (which, by the way, makes a great holiday gift for both mothers and daughters).

Since writing her book, Alya has been invited to write for a number of blogs about her experiences and the lessons she’s learned. In this piece, she shares her insights on what this experience taught her – and what we can all learn – about how to overcome the challenges we face in order to ultimately be successful in our efforts.

Life, as we know it, is full of challenges. Finding the right job, making enough money to pay the bills, building and maintaining relationships, and accomplishing our goals is not always easy, and yet they make our lives feel successful and happy.

For me, one of the many challenges I faced was publishing my own book, “Don’t Change: A Mother’s Letter Of Love For Her Daughter”, without the help of a publisher. Many times I had to contact Amazon to get the information I needed to publish my book – the image size requirements, available print sizes, how the royalty payments worked, and many other details. Other times, I had to research online to figure out how to create my book.

When publishing my book, I not only needed many different computer and artistic skills, but I also needed self-confidence, determination and perseverance, patience, curiosity, and the encouragement and support of those around me. Some of these skills I already possessed, others I needed to develop to complete my book. Here are four lessons I want to share that helped me to develop the skills I needed to accomplish my goal, steps you can take to help you achieve yours. Click here to continue reading »”A Teenager’s 4 Lessons On How We Can Face Any Challenge”

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