TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

How To Successfully Achieve Your Goals This Year

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Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of being invited to be the in-studio guest expert on CBC Radio to discuss why people have a hard time keeping their New Year’s Resolutions and what we should be doing to be successful in achieving our goals.

Over the course of the hour-long show, the show’s host invited callers from across Montreal to call in to share their experiences in making New Year’s Resolutions after which he asked me to share my insights on how people can succeed at achieving their goals over the next 12 months.

Although the focus of the program was on New Year’s Resolutions, I realized that some of the insights I discussed on this show are also valuable for leaders who want to make sure they are providing the right conditions for their employees to be successful in their collective efforts.

And so with 2016 now well under way, I’d like to share the following 3 key strategies that will help you cross the finish line in achieving those goals you’ve mapped out for your organization to attain this year.

1. Direct your focus towards goals that matter
In much of my work with leaders in both Canada and the US, one issue that repeatedly comes up is the struggle with busyness – of feeling like the work we’re doing is simply for the sake of getting things off our plate so we can move onto the next thing demanding our attention, as opposed to doing work that helps move our organization forward in achieving our shared vision.

Indeed, there’s been a number of studies that have pointed out how today’s leaders are operating from an increasingly distracted state – where their focus is often taken away from what matters most to their organization’s shared purpose due to the increasing pull they face on their time, attention and resources.

As such, while many of us are understandably feeling as though our workloads continue to increase year after year, the kind of work we do every day is becoming more and more disconnected from what inspires us to show up and deliver our best efforts to the cause.

That’s why when it comes to defining goals for those you lead, you need to answer the question – why does it matter? [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter] Why should your employees dedicate their talents, creativity, and efforts to making this goal a reality? And where will it lead your organization once you’ve achieved it? Click here to continue reading »”How To Successfully Achieve Your Goals This Year”

What It Takes To Be Captain Of The Change Journey

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The following is a guest piece from Dr. Karin Stumpf.

Implementing change is a vital requirement of modern business life. In my work as a change professional I have identified three leadership attributes (also described in more details in my book “Leading Business Change”) that are key to successful change:

  • Being active in shaping the organization transformation
  • Role modeling the required behavioral adjustments and
  • Motivating the people involved and impacted

1. Shaping the Organization Transformation
Being a shaper means being clear on the way forward, being able to explain to others how they will transition from one situation to another. As the change leader, you are ultimately responsible for the delivery of the expected results and you need to take ownership, as well as making (some tough) decisions whenever required.

It is fine to have an open mind to different opinions to get the ultimate solution, but at some point you have to act at the risk of being wrong. I have seen too many managers fear mistakes. They want to spend so much time trying to make sure they “get it right the first time” that their inaction leads to the entire project’s immobilization. In business as in life, you cannot move forward by standing still.

That necessarily entails being able to Click here to continue reading »”What It Takes To Be Captain Of The Change Journey”

Transforming Leadership And Trust In The Organization

Leadership-and-trustThe following is a guest piece from author David Amerland.

There is a change happening at the very top of the organizational hierarchy that, like a weather vane, reflects some of the fundamental changes happening across every organization and the marketplace they operate in. When organizations were hidden behind opaque operational fronts and top-down, one-way marketing, a leader was expected to play the role of an omnipotent god.

As recently as 2005 leadership theory talked about personality traits that leaders possessed, debated whether leaders are born or made and focused much of its work on how to identify and groom leaders so they can take over and lead those who worked for them.

Trust in the organization was created by its perceived status as a business and a whole lot of money spent in creating slick veneers and expensive advertising. Trust in an organization’s leader was created by their philosophy of leadership, their personality, or their style of management. Everything was compartmentalized and everything was strictly managed.

This is what has happened between that time and now: Click here to continue reading »”Transforming Leadership And Trust In The Organization”

Honouring Our Commitment To Show Up

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For the past several years, one constant of my leadership blog has been the fact that I publish new leadership insights every Tuesday throughout the year. It’s something that’s important not just for my readers as it allows them to know when to expect my latest leadership piece, but it also helps me to overcome those inevitable bouts of procrastination that every writer has to grapple with in the process of creating a new work.

Of course, sometimes the problem with publishing new material for my leadership blog has less to do with overcoming procrastination as it does with the downside of having a fixed day of the week on which to publish new articles.

It’s a problem that came to light a few years ago when I noticed that both Christmas Day and New Year’s Day fell on a Tuesday – the very day of the week that I publish new articles for my leadership blog.

Given that most of my readers would be spending time with family and friends instead of reading articles online, I naturally felt some reluctance with writing two new pieces for those dates considering that in all likelihood they would go unnoticed.

My wife also pointed out that since most people won’t be interested in reading articles about work while on their holiday break, this could be a nice opportunity for me to take a break and just save these ideas to share at another time later in the new year.

From almost every vantage point, it just made sense for me to save these leadership insights until after the holiday break when more people were likely to read these new pieces.

And yet, something didn’t sit right with me in skipping out on providing something new for my readers to ponder and consider about the nature of leadership. In part, this feeling was due to the fact that at this point I had garnered a sizeable international audience in parts of the world where it was business as usual instead of a holiday period.

But what ultimately drove me to publish two new pieces on both Christmas Day and New Year’s Day that year was something more internal, more meaningful. It was a feeling that I wanted to honour the commitment I had made to my readers – namely, that each and every Tuesday, I would share my insights on how they can become a better leader for those under their care.

This wasn’t just about doing what’s right or what’s expected. It was about recognizing that the key to success is not just what we know, but how driven we are to show up and deliver our best [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter]; to demonstrate our commitment to bring our best selves to the work we do.

Granted, I’m sure my readers would have understood why I chose to take a break in not writing something new for those two weeks. And yet, if we think about it, what makes successful people stand out from others is Click here to continue reading »”Honouring Our Commitment To Show Up”

Where Do We Go From Here?

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As 2015 begins to wind down, many of us – myself included – are understandably eager to wrap up the remaining work threads of this year so we can shift our focus to what we’d like to achieve and move forward with in the New Year.

Indeed, researchers at Wharton University have found that moments that stir notions of a fresh start or a new beginning are aligned with that internal motivation we all have to strive to do better, to be better than we are today.

And yet, as most of us know firsthand, those promises that a new year often brings to mind invariably loses out to the day-to-day realities that once again drive our attention away from the things we long to achieve or transform within ourselves.

It’s little surprise, then, that soon after the start of this upcoming new year, many of us will be left feeling as if those plans and goals we set for ourselves to achieve were simply an adult version of calling out “do-over!”, hoping that the chance to start over will somehow lead us to a better reality than the one we have right now.

Of course, it’s not just the end of one year and the impending arrival of a new one that stirs such sentiments and perceptions.

In working and talking with leaders across Canada and the US, it was clear that one thing they shared in common was that feeling of being caught in a perpetual loop where progress is simply defined by getting things done instead of by making a tangible difference, both for their organization and in the lives of those under their care.

Unfortunately, this feeling has left many leaders questioning not only their efficacy, but even the value they bring to their organization through their leadership. Of whether this is all that there is for them offer to those they lead.

Granted, it’s a good thing that these leaders are willing to openly express that frustration because it means that they know they can and should expect more from themselves; of what they can inspire, empower, and provide through their leadership.

But it also illustrates the importance of using milestone moments like the impending start of a new year to Click here to continue reading »”Where Do We Go From Here?”

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