TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Why Storytelling Matters In Today’s Leadership

Power-of-storytelling-leadership

With this latest piece on my leadership blog, I’m delighted to announce a new partnership with The Economist Executive Education Navigator. The opportunity to collaborate with such a respected and renowned publication is both an exciting opportunity and a great honour.

Through this new partnership, I will be contributing articles to The Economist Executive Education Navigator and in addition, I will be featuring articles originally published on The Economist Executive Education Navigator website. So to kickstart this new partnership, I decided to reprint the article below on the importance of storytelling skills for today’s leaders. But before I do, allow me to first share my own thoughts on this topic.

Of the many skills and traits that today’s leaders are expected to have in order to help their organization succeed and thrive, effective communication is without question one of critical foundation stones for successful leadership in today’s interconnected, digital world.

Of course, when it comes to discussions on how leaders can do a better job communicating their idea or vision to those under their care, there is naturally a focus on how leaders can employ storytelling to not only articulate their vision, but how this communication tool can help motivate employees to commit their native talents, creativity, and insights to making that shared purpose a reality.

Granted, in this digital age of text messages, emails, video conferencing, and social media, storytelling as a communication tool can seem a bit quaint, harkening more the image of people sitting around a campfire sharing stories than around a conference table trying to figure out the next steps of a new initiative or how to resolve a current issue.

But the fact remains that storytelling is a powerful and effective vehicle for leaders to better inform, inspire, and educate those they lead of not only the journey before them, but of the challenges that stand in their way.

The simple truth is that no one Click here to continue reading »”Why Storytelling Matters In Today’s Leadership”

Creating Intentional Impact That Brings People With You

Intentional-impact-leadership

The following is a guest piece by Inc. columnist Anese Cavanaugh.

We’re well into 2016 now. Recaps, core lessons, results, learning, and themes of 2015 have likely been captured; solutions, goals, intentions, planning, and strategy for 2016 is likely in action… Now what?

How do you make sure that this year stays intentional, awake, and that you lead yourself and your team into a new level of impact? How do you help impact happen in an efficient and collaborative manner? How do you save time, energy, and money in creating outcomes and having life-giving (not soul-sucking) meetings?

And how do you do this all in a way that holds each person accountable for showing up, leading with care, and feeling on purpose and energized vs. on auto pilot and exhausted, by the end of the first quarter?

This can be simple.

You’re going to want to be really intentional about the impact you create together.

You’re going to want to emphasize, support, and model the importance of self-care, of showing up, and bringing your best self to the table.

And, you’re going to need presence. (In all meanings of this word: presence in the moment, presence with your current reality, presence with other, presence with self, executive presence… I’m talking presence in the most holistic sense of the word.). To do this means we have to address 3 key elements: Click here to continue reading »”Creating Intentional Impact That Brings People With You”

How To Successfully Achieve Your Goals This Year

Successfully-achieving-goals-quote

Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of being invited to be the in-studio guest expert on CBC Radio to discuss why people have a hard time keeping their New Year’s Resolutions and what we should be doing to be successful in achieving our goals.

Over the course of the hour-long show, the show’s host invited callers from across Montreal to call in to share their experiences in making New Year’s Resolutions after which he asked me to share my insights on how people can succeed at achieving their goals over the next 12 months.

Although the focus of the program was on New Year’s Resolutions, I realized that some of the insights I discussed on this show are also valuable for leaders who want to make sure they are providing the right conditions for their employees to be successful in their collective efforts.

And so with 2016 now well under way, I’d like to share the following 3 key strategies that will help you cross the finish line in achieving those goals you’ve mapped out for your organization to attain this year.

1. Direct your focus towards goals that matter
In much of my work with leaders in both Canada and the US, one issue that repeatedly comes up is the struggle with busyness – of feeling like the work we’re doing is simply for the sake of getting things off our plate so we can move onto the next thing demanding our attention, as opposed to doing work that helps move our organization forward in achieving our shared vision.

Indeed, there’s been a number of studies that have pointed out how today’s leaders are operating from an increasingly distracted state – where their focus is often taken away from what matters most to their organization’s shared purpose due to the increasing pull they face on their time, attention and resources.

As such, while many of us are understandably feeling as though our workloads continue to increase year after year, the kind of work we do every day is becoming more and more disconnected from what inspires us to show up and deliver our best efforts to the cause.

That’s why when it comes to defining goals for those you lead, you need to answer the question – why does it matter? [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter] Why should your employees dedicate their talents, creativity, and efforts to making this goal a reality? And where will it lead your organization once you’ve achieved it? Click here to continue reading »”How To Successfully Achieve Your Goals This Year”

What It Takes To Be Captain Of The Change Journey

Successful-change-leadership

The following is a guest piece from Dr. Karin Stumpf.

Implementing change is a vital requirement of modern business life. In my work as a change professional I have identified three leadership attributes (also described in more details in my book “Leading Business Change”) that are key to successful change:

  • Being active in shaping the organization transformation
  • Role modeling the required behavioral adjustments and
  • Motivating the people involved and impacted

1. Shaping the Organization Transformation
Being a shaper means being clear on the way forward, being able to explain to others how they will transition from one situation to another. As the change leader, you are ultimately responsible for the delivery of the expected results and you need to take ownership, as well as making (some tough) decisions whenever required.

It is fine to have an open mind to different opinions to get the ultimate solution, but at some point you have to act at the risk of being wrong. I have seen too many managers fear mistakes. They want to spend so much time trying to make sure they “get it right the first time” that their inaction leads to the entire project’s immobilization. In business as in life, you cannot move forward by standing still.

That necessarily entails being able to Click here to continue reading »”What It Takes To Be Captain Of The Change Journey”

Transforming Leadership And Trust In The Organization

Leadership-and-trustThe following is a guest piece from author David Amerland.

There is a change happening at the very top of the organizational hierarchy that, like a weather vane, reflects some of the fundamental changes happening across every organization and the marketplace they operate in. When organizations were hidden behind opaque operational fronts and top-down, one-way marketing, a leader was expected to play the role of an omnipotent god.

As recently as 2005 leadership theory talked about personality traits that leaders possessed, debated whether leaders are born or made and focused much of its work on how to identify and groom leaders so they can take over and lead those who worked for them.

Trust in the organization was created by its perceived status as a business and a whole lot of money spent in creating slick veneers and expensive advertising. Trust in an organization’s leader was created by their philosophy of leadership, their personality, or their style of management. Everything was compartmentalized and everything was strictly managed.

This is what has happened between that time and now: Click here to continue reading »”Transforming Leadership And Trust In The Organization”

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