TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

How To Increase Self-Awareness In Our Leadership

Encouraging--leadership-self-awareness

In my previous piece, I discussed why leadership should be hard in the context of how so many leaders I’ve work with are now struggling to find balance between the rising demands on their attention and resources, and having the time to assess their leadership and what they need to do going forward.

Given how that piece was based on my own reflections of this past year, I was delighted to see its message resonating with so many of my readers. Among the many comments I received regarding that piece were questions about some of the strategies I use for reflection and increasing my sense of self-awareness.

Now before I share the strategies I use for reflection and review, I’d like to first briefly point out the findings of a recent study for why it’s so important for leaders – in light of the growing demands for their time, attention, and resources – to use reflection in their leadership.

Dr. David Zes and Dr. Dana Landis analyzed self-assessments from almost 7 000 professionals in about 500 publicly traded companies looking for gaps in how individuals viewed their competencies as compared to how their colleagues viewed their performance. This data was then compared against the return on investment for the company’s stock over a period of almost two and a half years.

Through their analysis, the researchers found that the employees that worked at poorly performing companies had on average 20% more blind spots as compared to those who worked at financially strong companies. Also, employees at poor-performing companies were 79% more likely to demonstrate low levels of self-awareness as compared to employees who worked at companies that were delivering a strong return on investment.

What their study’s findings revealed is that self-awareness Click here to continue reading »”How To Increase Self-Awareness In Our Leadership”

How To Delegate Purpose In Your Organization

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In my previous piece, I shared three strategies used by two distinct organizations to help promote and support a sense of community and shared ownership in their respective workplaces – a mindset and approach that’s becoming increasingly critical for leaders to foster in order to support their organization’s adaptability and long-term success.

In this follow-up piece, I want to build on those three strategies by examining a process most leaders currently employ through their leadership and how we can better use this tactic to not only drive organizational success, but to strengthen the commitment our employees make to our shared purpose.

As the title of this piece points out, what I’m referring to here is the process of delegation.

When it comes to delegation in today’s organizations, the common tendency leaders have is to simply delegate those tasks or projects that we don’t want to do. Work that requires time and attention that we can’t be bothered to expend our limited resources on, and so we hand them off to our employees.

While this approach might help us to better manage our daily grind, the problem with this is that the act of delegation becomes a lost opportunity for us to connect what matters to our employees with what matters to our organization.

In order to improve and sustain employee morale over the long run, we need to understand what will help our employees feel like they are contributing meaningfully to our organization; that they understand the connection between their efforts and the shared purpose that defines why we do what we do.

Now this can be a challenge for many leaders because we instinctively want to make sure we maintain some form of control over things, not to mention that fear that if our employees fail, we not only have to do the work we assigned them, but we also have to address the mistakes they made.

And yet, we have to remind ourselves that our employees are not going to care about our vision if we only give them work that no one else wants to do.

So with this in mind, I’d like to discuss a strategy I’ve shared with my clients and with those who’ve attended some of my talks on how we can delegate not just tasks to our employees, but a sense of purpose and meaning, along with giving them that much-needed opportunity to learn and grow. Click here to continue reading »”How To Delegate Purpose In Your Organization”

How A Sense Of Community Can Help Us Achieve Greatness

Organizational-community-fosters-greatness

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of being interviewed by various media outlets about my first book, “Leadership Vertigo”. What’s been interesting about this process is how in many of these conversations, there was much interest to discuss the point made in the book about the importance of leaders fostering a sense of community in their organizations.

As long-time readers of my writings on leadership know, this is something that’s been an underlying theme in many of my insights into how we can be a better leader to those we serve – where we ensure that we’re creating an environment where our employees understand the value of their contributions and why we collectively do what we do.

Of course, in these conversations about my book, the focus is not on the relevance of community-building in today’s organizations, but rather how do we go about doing this in light of the numerous demands on a leader’s time, attention and resources while operating in a doing-more-with-less environment.

It’s a great question and the answer to which is one that I want to share with my readers so that they too can understand how we can go about fostering that sense of community in our organizations despite the accelerated pace that we now have to operate in.

And to help illustrate these points, I’m going to use examples from two very diverse organizations – Pixar Animation Studios and the European Space Agency – in order to help demonstrate the value and importance of fostering a sense of belonging and purpose to helping your organization to succeed and thrive now and in the years ahead.

1. Create opportunities for employees to interact outside of formal roles
When Pixar began designing its new campus ground in Emeryville, California, then Chairman and CEO Steve Jobs wanted to create a common meeting space for the organization’s employees in order to facilitate sparks of creativity, inspiration, and “unplanned collaborations”.

The goal in establishing such an environment was simple – by creating an open space for people to meet and discuss, employees from different departments would be encouraged to Click here to continue reading »”How A Sense Of Community Can Help Us Achieve Greatness”

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #15 – Tanveer Naseer On Overcoming Leadership Vertigo

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With so many books, articles, and studies on how leaders can be more effective guiding their teams in today’s faster-paced, global environment, why do leaders still struggle to help their organizations to succeed? That’s the basis of the conversation in this VERY special episode of Leadership Biz Cafe which wraps up the month-long celebration of the release of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo”.

In this special episode of my show, I’m delighted to hand over hosting duties to my friend David Burkus, author of “The Myths of Creativity” and host of the leadership podcast show, LDRLB, so he can interview me about my new book, as well as asking about my future plans, including a discussion about my next leadership book.

Over the course of this discussion, David and I discuss:

  • What is leadership vertigo and how does it impact leaders in today’s organizations.
  • Understanding one of the key challenges organizations face in terms of balancing leadership development and retaining key talent.
  • What Martin Luther King, Jr. and Nelson Mandela help us to understand about the importance of community and why it’s necessary to rallying employees around our vision or long-term objectives.
  • My experience with a public transit janitor on the Chicago L-Train and what his actions reveal about the true nature of credibility in leadership.
  • What’s next in store for me, including a discussion of what the focus of my next leadership book will be.

As David mentions at the end of this special episode, I’d love to hear what you think about this conversation about my first leadership book, as well as hearing what other topics this might spur your interest in learning more about in future episodes of my show. To do so, please leave me a comment below or fill out the contact form found on my website.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast: Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #15 – Tanveer Naseer On Overcoming Leadership Vertigo”

The 3 Things Leaders Must Do To Build Meaningful Communities

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Last week, I shared the news of a special, month-long leadership series here on my blog to celebrate the release of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo” (to learn more about the book and the numerous book retailers where you can buy a copy, click here to check out the book page on my website).

To kick-start this special celebratory leadership series, I’m delighted and honoured to welcome Doug Conant, Chairman of Avon Products and retired CEO and President of the Campbell Soup Company. In this special guest piece written for this celebratory leadership series, Doug shares his insights and experiences with the 1st leadership principle discussed in the book, “Build Community” and how it can help leaders to ensure they are helping their employees to succeed and grow. 

Doug, it’s my honour and pleasure to have you start off this celebration on my blog. I’m grateful and humbled by how generous and supportive you’ve been of my writings and insights on leadership, as well as of this initiative on my blog to help leaders become the kind of leader their employees need them to be.

* * * * *

“If we’re all facing the same issues of having fewer resources and less time to do things, if we’re all aware of the increasing demands from our employees for our time and attention, why is it that some of us are able to meet these expectations while the rest of us are missing the mark?” – From Leadership Vertigo by Tanveer Naseer and S. Max Brown

Have you ever set a concrete goal and worked tirelessly towards reaching it, only to realize you haven’t quite hit your target? If so, you’re not alone.

In their new book, Leadership Vertigo, Tanveer Naseer and S. Max Brown explore the elusive space between leaders’ best intentions and their actual actions. Many leaders have an aspirational mission that drives their work but fall short when it comes to actually reaching their goals in a sustainable way. Or worse, they may delude themselves that things are on track only to be faced with the sobering reality that they are missing the mark.

In their book, Naseer and Brown endeavor to help leaders entrenched in this counterproductive “leadership vertigo.” By identifying 4 key “pillars” of success, the book helps leaders mired in adversity to recalibrate and achieve enduring success.

When Tanveer approached me to talk about their first “pillar”, Build Community, I was happy to share my experiences as CEO of Campbell Soup Company, and to help answer this trenchant leadership question: Click here to continue reading »”The 3 Things Leaders Must Do To Build Meaningful Communities”

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