TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

The 3 Things Leaders Must Do To Build Meaningful Communities

Building-communities-leadership-vertigo

Last week, I shared the news of a special, month-long leadership series here on my blog to celebrate the release this month of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo”, co-written with S. Max Brown (to learn more about the book and the numerous book retailers where you can buy a copy, click here to check out the book page on my website).

To kick-start this special celebratory leadership series, I’m delighted and honoured to welcome Doug Conant, Chairman of Avon Products and retired CEO and President of the Campbell Soup Company. In this special guest piece written for this celebratory leadership series, Doug shares his insights and experiences with the 1st leadership principle discussed in the book, “Build Community” and how it can help leaders to ensure they are helping their employees to succeed and grow. 

Doug, it’s my honour and pleasure to have you start off this celebration on my blog. I’m grateful and humbled by how generous and supportive you’ve been of my writings and insights on leadership, as well as of this initiative on my blog to help leaders become the kind of leader their employees need them to be.

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“If we’re all facing the same issues of having fewer resources and less time to do things, if we’re all aware of the increasing demands from our employees for our time and attention, why is it that some of us are able to meet these expectations while the rest of us are missing the mark?” – From Leadership Vertigo by Tanveer Naseer and S. Max Brown

Have you ever set a concrete goal and worked tirelessly towards reaching it, only to realize you haven’t quite hit your target? If so, you’re not alone.

In their new book, Leadership Vertigo, Tanveer Naseer and S. Max Brown explore the elusive space between leaders’ best intentions and their actual actions. Many leaders have an aspirational mission that drives their work but fall short when it comes to actually reaching their goals in a sustainable way. Or worse, they may delude themselves that things are on track only to be faced with the sobering reality that they are missing the mark.

In their book, Naseer and Brown endeavor to help leaders entrenched in this counterproductive “leadership vertigo.” By identifying 4 key “pillars” of success, the book helps leaders mired in adversity to recalibrate and achieve enduring success.

When Tanveer approached me to talk about their first “pillar”, Build Community, I was happy to share my experiences as CEO of Campbell Soup Company, and to help answer this trenchant leadership question: Click here to continue reading »”The 3 Things Leaders Must Do To Build Meaningful Communities”

3 Valuable Insights Leaders Can Learn From Neuroscience

Leadership-insights-neuroscience

The following is a guest piece by Jesse Newton and Josh Davis.

If you’re trying to instill organizational change in your company, then you face not just a logistical shift, but a cultural challenge as well. Employees will have to think differently, see people differently, and act in new ways. Employees also need to continually reinforce the right habits in one another so that the customer experience is on their minds everywhere.

One method that can help is known as pride building. This is a cultural intervention in which leaders seek out a few employees who are already known to be master motivators, adept at inspiring strategic awareness among their colleagues. These master motivators are invited to recommend specific measures that enable better ways of working.

Pride builders in a wide variety of companies and industries tend to recommend three specific measures time and time again: (1) giving more autonomy to frontline workers, (2) clearly explaining to staff members the significance and Click here to continue reading »”3 Valuable Insights Leaders Can Learn From Neuroscience”

Understanding The Value Of Charisma In Leadership

Charismatic-leaders-help-those-around-them

Last week, I had the pleasure of giving the keynote speech at the 2014 NAED LEAD Conference held in Chicago. Given how the focus of my speech was examining the role of charisma in leadership and how we can develop this trait to inspire and engage our employees, it would seem almost natural that the locale for this keynote was this elegant, almost regal ballroom located in one of the illustrious hotels found along Chicago’s “Magnificent Mile”.

Of course, for those who attended my keynote speech, what was a true reflection of the lessons I shared through my talk was the opportunity to connect with new people to listen to their stories about what their successes and their failures have helped them to learn moving forward.

With this in mind, I want to share with you not the highlights of my keynote speech and the various actionable measures that I taught conference attendees to adopt and apply to their own leadership style of guiding their organization. Rather, what I’d like to share here are my reflections from delivering this message to this audience, and hearing what attendees shared about how they would apply these new insights to become a better leader to those under their care.

Tanveer delivering keynote speech at 2014 LEAD Conference in Chicago.

Tanveer delivering keynote speech at 2014 LEAD Conference in Chicago.

To begin, let us first understand that charisma is not simply about having this natural charm or a magnetic aura that some of us seem to naturally possess to draw in those around us. Rather, as the Oxford Dictionary points out, charisma refers to our ability “to inspire followers with devotion and enthusiasm”.

In other words, charisma is not simply about how charming those around us perceive us to be, but our ability to inspire and engage our employees to Click here to continue reading »”Understanding The Value Of Charisma In Leadership”

5 Important Keys For Taking On New Leadership Challenges

Successfully-leading-established-teams

Of the various articles I’ve written for my website, this one is quite unique as it’s the product of a writing collaboration between myself and Col. Chris R. Stricklin. At the time we were writing this piece, Chris was stationed at Kabul, Afghanistan as the Chief of Staff/Chief Operating Officer for the NATO Air Training Command.

In addition to the unique experience of shaping and discussing the various points we wanted to share in this piece, it was wonderful to see how quickly we discovered both the common ground we share, along with the commonality found in our individual experiences regarding the challenges we’ve faced and seen in how we can help to bring out the best in those around us – even from a half a world away.

I hope you’ll enjoy the combined insights Chris and I bring to this piece on how we can effectively take over the reins of an established team and help them to continue to achieve success in attaining the shared purpose that defines why we do what we do.

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The house is perfect. Yard meticulously manicured, walls freshly painted, window treatments perfectly hung…it is as you dreamed…just as you move out. For those who move often, it is a commonly understood idiom the house is always the way we want it just before we move out.

As a leader, the same goes for developing a team. You develop those who follow to be intrinsically motivated toward the success of your mission and you meticulously handpick the different levels of leaders below you to execute your vision.

When it is finally running like a well-oiled machine, corporate promotes you to the next level of challenge. What about your successor? People think that assuming a leadership position over a poorly performing organization is the biggest challenge you could face, but the truth is… becoming the leader of a tight team is a larger challenge.

Follow these five simple ground rules and your new leadership challenge will be off to a great start. Click here to continue reading »”5 Important Keys For Taking On New Leadership Challenges”

How We Can Develop A Culture Of Learning

Creating-continuous-learning-culture

One of the great joys I get from my work is the opportunity to connect and build relationships with some truly exceptional leaders and people. One of them is my friend, Bob Bennett, the guest writer of this piece. After seeing one of Bob’s talks two years ago, I knew this was a leader I had to connect with, and our conversations and emails since then have been inspiring, informative, and just plain fun. When you read the guest piece he’s written below, you’ll understand why.

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I am blessed to have grandchildren, because they teach me something new every day – even things like leadership and business.

One week shy of their third birthday my wife and I took two of our grandchildren, May and Tucker, to Disney World. They are twins; May is an instigator and manipulator. Tucker is ‘all boy’ and extremely active but sensitive. Both have a quest for knowledge; they can talk with you all day about habitats, inertia, paleontologists, and, as Tucker calls it, ‘gestion,’ the art of turning the food one eats into energy.

We stayed at a cabin in the Wilderness Village. We spent four full days at the separate theme parks, going on every ride that did not have a height restriction.

While packing to leave after the ‘adventure,’ my wife and I wondered which were the kids’ favorite rides. The decision: Tucker – Toy Story; May – Ariel. So, as would any grandparent, we asked them.

The first surprise for us was the speed with which they answered the question. They both answered immediately Click here to continue reading »”How We Can Develop A Culture Of Learning”

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