TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

The Language Of Leadership

Language-of-leadership

These days, we talk a lot about the benefits of embracing diversity in the workplace. Of how intermingling people of different cultures, beliefs and nationalities can allow us to tap into the diversity of thoughts, ideas, and perspectives that go with these unique demographic elements.

Of course, sometimes it can be difficult to appreciate just how these differences can help us to discover new insights, particularly if we live in a fairly homogeneous population. As such, I’d like to share the following four words from languages found in different parts of the world to not only show how these diverse viewpoints can benefit your organization, but also how they remind us of the underlying commonalities that we all share.

1. Meraki – Creating work that ignites our creativity and soul
In the Greek language, there is a word they use called “Meraki” which means ‘doing something with soul, creativity, or love’; that you’re able to put “something of yourself” into what you’re doing. In most cases, meraki is used to refer to how one prepares a meal, arranges a room, or sets an elegant table.

Although meraki is typically used to describe moments in our home lives, there is an important message here for us to take note of in terms of the kind of work environment we create for our employees. Click here to continue reading »”The Language Of Leadership”

3 Olympic Stories That Inspire Us To Become Better Leaders

Leadership-inspiration-from-Olympics

With the end of the 2014 Sochi Winter Games on Sunday, many of us are now returning to our regular work routines and viewing habits, having a deeper appreciation for the world of sports and the power of the human spirit. In many ways, that’s probably the most interesting aspect about the Olympics – of how it not only draws us in on sporting events we otherwise wouldn’t follow, but how it also binds us together through that sense of camaraderie and kinship.

Of course, the other interesting aspect of the Olympics is how they provide a microcosm of cause-and-effect; where in the span of a few minutes we can see firsthand what all those years of training and sacrifice have given rise to.

This distilled concentration of human effort and achievement provides a unique backdrop from which we can glean new insights into how we can inspire those around us to believe in their potential to succeed and achieve more than they thought possible.

It’s from that perspective that I’d like to share the following three stories from these Winter Olympic Games where we can discover important lessons on what we need to do to become better leaders for those under our care.

1. Denny Morrison and Gilmore Junio – Putting others ahead of ourselves

Morrison-Junio-sharing-Olympic-win

When Denny Morrison crossed the finish line in the men’s 1000M speed skating final, the real story wasn’t his winning the silver medal. Instead, it was the fact that his team mate, Gilmore Junio, had given up his spot to allow Morrison to compete at the Sochi Olympic Games.

While competing in the Canadian Olympic team trials, Morrison lost his footing and fell to the ice, leading him to be disqualified from the team. Although Junio skated a clean run to qualify for the Olympic team, he knew that Morrison was the stronger skater and represented a better chance for Canada to get a medal in this event.

And so, Junio gave the spot he had earned for himself to compete at the Olympics to Morrison, saying that he had to so because it was “in the best interest of the team.”

But Junio did more than Click here to continue reading »”3 Olympic Stories That Inspire Us To Become Better Leaders”

Will This Be The Year Leaders Put Employees First?

Leadership-putting-employees-first

As we approach the end of the first month of this new year, many of us are now well under way in implementing our plans and strategies to achieve the goals we’ve mapped out for the next 11 months. In terms of what leaders view as their top goals to achieve this year, a new study reveals some interesting opportunities, and with it, some key obstacles leaders will need to address if they are to help their organization move forward.

In the CEO Challenge 2014 study carried out by The Conference Board, CEOs and presidents from over 1 000 organizations around the world were asked to identify what they saw as the top challenges for their organization. While it wasn’t surprising to see innovation and customer relationships being included in the top 5 challenges, the study’s most revealing finding is how the top challenge for leaders worldwide was Human Capital – namely, how to engage, retain, manage and develop their employees.

In other words, leaders in every region of the world recognize that their employees are the defining factor both for their organization’s ability to achieve their goals this year, and as well as for their overall long-term success. As Rebecca Ray, Senior Vice President, Human Capital at The Conference Board, and co-author of this study points out:

“This emphasis on people-related issues makes perfect sense in a still-uncertain economy. Building a culture that supports engagement, employee training, leadership development, and high performance is something companies can control, and can mean the difference between growing market share and simply surviving in 2014. Moreover, if the focus of individual companies is sustained, Human Capital may well be the engine that revives economic growth.”

This is certainly encouraging news, as it reflects a growing shift from the survivalist/just treading water mindset to one that seeks opportunities for development and growth. However, we do have to be mindful of Click here to continue reading »”Will This Be The Year Leaders Put Employees First?”

Decoding The Truth Of Leading Multi-Generational Workforces

Research findings on leading multigenerational workforce

When it comes to discussions on the various challenges leaders need to address in today’s fast-changing global economy, there’s one topic that merits a proper assessment as to whether or not it’s really an issue for today’s organizations. And that is the issue of how to effectively manage a multi-generational workforce.

In some ways it’s only natural that we see an increase in discussions on potential challenges for organizations in operating under a multi-generational workforce. With the Boomer generation staying in the workforce longer due to declining retirement savings and increasing cost-of-living expenses, organizations are not only having to deal with three different generations of employees working together, but also the impact of a slowdown in the rate of upward career movement for younger workers.

The problem, though, with these discussions of managing a multi-generational workforce is when the focus shifts to trying to articulate differences in values, motivations, and attitudes based purely on generational cohorts, especially when it comes to trying to differentiate the Millennial generation from previous ones.

One of the key faults found in all these discussions on the differences between Millennials and the other generational cohorts is that they often differentiate generational values with respect to technological differences – in particular, differences in usage – as opposed to sociological ones. Specifically, how the focus tends to be on how Millennials are the first generation to grow up in a ‘high-tech’, mobile world.

We have to remember that Click here to continue reading »”Decoding The Truth Of Leading Multi-Generational Workforces”

« Older Entries