TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

How To Delegate Purpose In Your Organization

Delegating-purpose-through-leadership

In my previous piece, I shared three strategies used by two distinct organizations to help promote and support a sense of community and shared ownership in their respective workplaces – a mindset and approach that’s becoming increasingly critical for leaders to foster in order to support their organization’s adaptability and long-term success.

In this follow-up piece, I want to build on those three strategies by examining a process most leaders currently employ through their leadership and how we can better use this tactic to not only drive organizational success, but to strengthen the commitment our employees make to our shared purpose.

As the title of this piece points out, what I’m referring to here is the process of delegation.

When it comes to delegation in today’s organizations, the common tendency leaders have is to simply delegate those tasks or projects that we don’t want to do. Work that requires time and attention that we can’t be bothered to expend our limited resources on, and so we hand them off to our employees.

While this approach might help us to better manage our daily grind, the problem with this is that the act of delegation becomes a lost opportunity for us to connect what matters to our employees with what matters to our organization.

In order to improve and sustain employee morale over the long run, we need to understand what will help our employees feel like they are contributing meaningfully to our organization; that they understand the connection between their efforts and the shared purpose that defines why we do what we do.

Now this can be a challenge for many leaders because we instinctively want to make sure we maintain some form of control over things, not to mention that fear that if our employees fail, we not only have to do the work we assigned them, but we also have to address the mistakes they made.

And yet, we have to remind ourselves that our employees are not going to care about our vision if we only give them work that no one else wants to do.

So with this in mind, I’d like to discuss a strategy I’ve shared with my clients and with those who’ve attended some of my talks on how we can delegate not just tasks to our employees, but a sense of purpose and meaning, along with giving them that much-needed opportunity to learn and grow. Click here to continue reading »”How To Delegate Purpose In Your Organization”

How A Sense Of Community Can Help Us Achieve Greatness

Organizational-community-fosters-greatness

Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of being interviewed by various media outlets about my first book, “Leadership Vertigo”. What’s been interesting about this process is how in many of these conversations, there was much interest to discuss the point made in the book about the importance of leaders fostering a sense of community in their organizations.

As long-time readers of my writings on leadership know, this is something that’s been an underlying theme in many of my insights into how we can be a better leader to those we serve – where we ensure that we’re creating an environment where our employees understand the value of their contributions and why we collectively do what we do.

Of course, in these conversations about my book, the focus is not on the relevance of community-building in today’s organizations, but rather how do we go about doing this in light of the numerous demands on a leader’s time, attention and resources while operating in a doing-more-with-less environment.

It’s a great question and the answer to which is one that I want to share with my readers so that they too can understand how we can go about fostering that sense of community in our organizations despite the accelerated pace that we now have to operate in.

And to help illustrate these points, I’m going to use examples from two very diverse organizations – Pixar Animation Studios and the European Space Agency – in order to help demonstrate the value and importance of fostering a sense of belonging and purpose to helping your organization to succeed and thrive now and in the years ahead.

1. Create opportunities for employees to interact outside of formal roles
When Pixar began designing its new campus ground in Emeryville, California, then Chairman and CEO Steve Jobs wanted to create a common meeting space for the organization’s employees in order to facilitate sparks of creativity, inspiration, and “unplanned collaborations”.

The goal in establishing such an environment was simple – by creating an open space for people to meet and discuss, employees from different departments would be encouraged to Click here to continue reading »”How A Sense Of Community Can Help Us Achieve Greatness”

The 3 Questions Leaders Must Ask And Answer

3-leadership-performance-questions

The following is a guest piece by Scott Eblin.

During the past six of the fourteen years I’ve been an executive coach and leadership educator, my observation is that my clients are generally more stressed each year than they were the year before. The feeling of being overworked and overwhelmed has gone up year over year. One of the ways I know this is by asking a few questions at the beginning of most of my presentations.

Let’s say we have a roomful of 100 corporate executives and managers. The first question I ask is “How many of you have been promoted in the past year?” Usually around 20 or 30 percent of the audience members raise a hand. The next question is “How many of you are in the same job you were in a year ago but the scope is much bigger today?” That question brings a lot more raised hands – usually at least 80 percent of the audience.

Then I ask, “How many of you are in the same job you were in a year ago, but the performance bar has risen significantly in the past 12 months?” That’s usually about 100 percent of the hands. Finally, I ask, “How many of you are operating in a constantly changing competitive environment?” That is most definitely 100 percent of the hands.

If you’re doing the math at home, you recognize that most people are raising their hands at least twice, maybe three times or even four. So, it’s sort of obvious why they feel overworked and overwhelmed.

Beginning with the Financial Crisis of 2008, most organizations have adopted a Click here to continue reading »”The 3 Questions Leaders Must Ask And Answer”

Good Ideas Make It Harder To Be A Great Leader

Good-ideas-great-leadership

The following is a guest piece by Princeton University Professor Derek Lidow.

You would think that good ideas make it easier to be a good leader. Unfortunately, the opposite is true. Good ideas are threatening to leaders. By definition, good ideas mean an improvement over the present, a better way of doing things or even better lives.That’s why people who have good ideas expect their leaders to act on them, which creates an instant test of leadership: do you care enough for those around you to do something positive with the idea? Are you able to do something with it?

Good ideas of your own can be equally threatening. As a leader, how often have you had a good idea and then found yourself unsure how to turn it into reality, how to convert it into something of tangible value for you and for others? The experience can be not only threatening, but ultimately deflating.

It doesn’t have to be. Consider the most extreme and most personally threatening case in which leaders must turn good ideas into reality: entrepreneurship. Fail as a leader in this case and the entire enterprise goes down. And, in my experience, many entrepreneurial failures are failures of leadership, not of ideas.

Successful entrepreneurs, in meeting the stern test of leadership posed by good ideas, have much to teach us. If you can bring to the challenge of good ideas what the best entrepreneurial leaders (ELs) bring to it under threat of extinction, you will likely be able to handle anything that comes your way.

The great news is that the required skills can be learned. Indeed, you can even have major weaknesses, as long as you understand and mitigate them. Leaders who successfully lead the process of turning ideas into valuable, tangible realities are able to do five things uncommonly well: Click here to continue reading »”Good Ideas Make It Harder To Be A Great Leader”

How To Encourage Growth Under A Controlling Boss

Dealing-with-controlling-boss

One of the things I enjoy about my work is having conversations with people about the nature of leadership, and the challenges and opportunities leaders face in this continually evolving, interconnected business environment.

One of these conversations lead to a discussion about how leaders who want to push for change can deal with those above them who operate from the command-and-control style of leadership – in other words, those that subscribe to the overtly-controlling it’s my way or you’re out approach.

Since that conversation, I’ve had the opportunity to discuss and learn about how both employees and other leaders are also grappling with this organizational schism of dealing with someone stuck in an Industrial Age mindset of top-down leadership, while having to address today’s challenges and issues which require a more collaborative, inclusive and open workplace dynamic.

Based on these conversations, I’d like to share the following three measures that can help both employees and leaders who have to deal with a controlling boss who is clearly stuck in the ‘this is the way things are done around here’ mindset to ensure that they are able to promote growth and collective success in their organization.

1. Don’t focus on your value but on the value you can create
One of the common issues I hear when I discuss with clients and colleagues this issue of working for a controlling boss – especially those that operate from a top-down, win-at-all-costs leadership mindset – is how they feel like they’re more a means to an end than a valued contributor to their organization.

In discussing this situation, one thing that becomes clear is that both parties are almost speaking a different language in terms of their perspective and perception. For employees, their focus is on how to get those in charge to see them as being something more than what they do. For controlling bosses, however, their focus is simply on what they want their employees to get done in order to obtain their desired end result, regardless of the impact or impression that leaves on those under their care.

To resolve this difference in focus and attitudes, we need to Click here to continue reading »”How To Encourage Growth Under A Controlling Boss”

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