TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

How Leaders Can Successfully Champion Change

Leadership-championing-change

When it comes to seeking insights on the best leadership practices, the natural inclination is to look towards successful organizations like Southwest Airlines and Zappos for inspiration and guidance.

Not surprisingly, in most countries, one area we often disregard for leadership guidance is the political arena, as most politicians tend to represent examples of what not to do than what leaders should be doing to engage and enable those they serve.

This sad reality becomes especially apparent during election campaigns, where political candidates expect voters to believe in their capability to lead and their vision of creating a better, more inclusive future, even though their tactics to win include character attacks and sowing division within the populace.

And yet, if we distance ourselves from the headaches and negativity that regrettably have become par for the course of political elections, there are some tangible, practical insights that we can learn from. Insights that help us to understand what we need to do to get our employees to embrace the change initiatives we’re putting forth to ensure success in our collective efforts.

It’s from this perspective that I’d like to share with you three lessons from the recent provincial election campaign held this past month in Quebec, Canada, that help to illustrate what measures leaders need to employ to encourage their employees to embrace the change initiatives they have in mind for their organization.

1. Don’t just tell, but show why this change initiative matters Click here to continue reading »”How Leaders Can Successfully Champion Change”

3 Olympic Stories That Inspire Us To Become Better Leaders

Leadership-inspiration-from-Olympics

With the end of the 2014 Sochi Winter Games on Sunday, many of us are now returning to our regular work routines and viewing habits, having a deeper appreciation for the world of sports and the power of the human spirit. In many ways, that’s probably the most interesting aspect about the Olympics – of how it not only draws us in on sporting events we otherwise wouldn’t follow, but how it also binds us together through that sense of camaraderie and kinship.

Of course, the other interesting aspect of the Olympics is how they provide a microcosm of cause-and-effect; where in the span of a few minutes we can see firsthand what all those years of training and sacrifice have given rise to.

This distilled concentration of human effort and achievement provides a unique backdrop from which we can glean new insights into how we can inspire those around us to believe in their potential to succeed and achieve more than they thought possible.

It’s from that perspective that I’d like to share the following three stories from these Winter Olympic Games where we can discover important lessons on what we need to do to become better leaders for those under our care.

1. Denny Morrison and Gilmore Junio – Putting others ahead of ourselves

Morrison-Junio-sharing-Olympic-win

When Denny Morrison crossed the finish line in the men’s 1000M speed skating final, the real story wasn’t his winning the silver medal. Instead, it was the fact that his team mate, Gilmore Junio, had given up his spot to allow Morrison to compete at the Sochi Olympic Games.

While competing in the Canadian Olympic team trials, Morrison lost his footing and fell to the ice, leading him to be disqualified from the team. Although Junio skated a clean run to qualify for the Olympic team, he knew that Morrison was the stronger skater and represented a better chance for Canada to get a medal in this event.

And so, Junio gave the spot he had earned for himself to compete at the Olympics to Morrison, saying that he had to so because it was “in the best interest of the team.”

But Junio did more than Click here to continue reading »”3 Olympic Stories That Inspire Us To Become Better Leaders”

Leading Through The Power Of “And”

Power-of-And-in-Leadership

When it comes to discussions on leadership, there are certain constants or inevitable statements that you’re likely to come across. One of the most common of these stems from the ongoing debate over whether culture is more important than strategy in terms of the organization’s long-term success and viability.

Unfortunately, the popularity of debating the merits of one tactic over the other has recently given rise to a whole new set of either/or scenarios where leaders are encouraged to adopt one approach at the expense of the other. To date, some of the either/or scenarios I’ve seen debated include:

  • vision vs. strategy
  • knowledge vs. action
  • people vs. results
  • thinking vs. doing
  • managing Millennials vs. every other workplace generation

Of course, it’s understandable why there’s a growing appeal for this approach – given the increasing complexity of leading organizations in today’s interconnected global economy, it’s only natural that we want to find quick answers to help us navigate these often choppy waters.

And yet, the problem with these zero-sum models is that they not only misdirect our focus from more urgent issues, but they also create more harm than good for the following reasons:

1. It overlooks the dualistic nature of these approaches
I’ve read recently a few articles where people have argued that the fast-pace of today’s market demands less focus on knowledge and thinking and more on action and doing. Of course, it’s easy to argue for a take-charge bravado when you’re not leading an organization still suffering from risk aversion thanks to the difficulties faced over the last few years.

That’s not to say that we need to do the inverse – of waiting until we have all our ducks in a row before we release our collective efforts out into the world. Rather, it means Click here to continue reading »”Leading Through The Power Of “And””

A Look Back At My Top 10 Leadership Insights From 2013

My-top-leadership-posts-2013

As we welcome the arrival of a New Year, many of us are naturally filled with hope and excitement about the possibilities and opportunities for growth, change and success over the upcoming 12 months.

The beginning of a new year is also an excellent opportunity for reflection; of contemplating where we’ve been and where we could be. From that perspective, I’d like to share with you some of the leadership insights I’ve written about over the past 52 weeks, not just as a reminder of the lessons that were shared, but also so we can contemplate how we might apply them going forward.

Instead of a list of articles, though, I’d like to share a quote from ten of the most shared and commented pieces I wrote for my blog this past year, along with a link back to that piece if you’d like to learn more about that topic.

In this way, I hope to inspire you to celebrate your accomplishments of the past year in leading your team and organization, as well as to encourage you to find opportunities to become the kind of leader your employees need you to be. The kind of leader who will not only help them to succeed and thrive, but one where you will also find a sense of purpose and fulfilment in what you do.

So here now are my quotes from the top 10 leadership pieces I wrote from 2013, as selected by you, the readers of my blog:

 

The key to building a thriving organization:

“In our pursuit to create meaning through our shared efforts, we need to ensure that we’re creating value not just for our customers or shareholders, but also for our employees, if not also for the community in which we operate … we have to make sure we’re creating and communicating Click here to continue reading »”A Look Back At My Top 10 Leadership Insights From 2013″

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