TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Are You Creating Purpose Through Your Leadership?

Leading-with-purpose

Over the past few months, I’ve been noticing a common thread in my work with various leaders and organizations, as well through my various speaking engagements with audiences in Canada and the US. Regardless of whether it’s the private or public sector, there’s a clear desire out there among many leaders to understand how to better engage their employees in the work they do.

No doubt a key factor behind this drive to better understand how to get employees to fully commit their discretionary efforts to their organization’s shared purpose stems from the realities of leading today’s organizations. Faced with increasing demands on their time, attention, and limited resources, it’s very easy for leaders to lose sight of what their employees truly need to feel inspired and empowered in the contributions they make to their organization.

Certainly, there are numerous studies out there which help shed some light on just how far organizations and their leaders have to go to improve employee engagement and productivity in their workplace.

From Gallup’s finding that only 13% of employees in 140 countries surveyed were engaged in the work they do, to Salary.com’s multi-year findings that 20% of a typical workday in US organizations is spent on non-work related tasks because employees don’t get a sense of value from what they do, it’s clear that this is a critical issue for every leader to consider and address.

Of course, when faced with such findings, it’s easy for leaders to either assume their organization is the exception to these findings, or that to address these issues requires some large-scale transformation in terms of the type of work they assign to their employees.

Regardless of how leaders choose to react to such findings about the realities found in today’s workplaces, one thing that’s clear is that in order to truly improve the way we work, leaders need to shift their focus from Click here to continue reading »”Are You Creating Purpose Through Your Leadership?”

6 Internal Sources Of Strength For Leaders To Develop

Leadership-strength

The following is a guest piece by Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, PsyD.

We leaders tend to focus on developing external resources. How can we make the best use of our team’s time, budget, and expertise? Yes, these are important considerations, and leaders who ignore them won’t be leading for long. But too often, leaders focus so much on external factors that they neglect (or completely ignore) their internal resources: their attitudes, perspectives, motivation, and beliefs that make up their true selves.

I get why this happens. Too many people view self-work as an unnecessary “soft skill”, a waste of time. It can seem especially wasteful when your life is a series of exhausting sprints from one impossibly tight deadline to another. Yet nothing could be further from the truth.

Nurturing and developing your inner resources — which I call leading from the heart — makes your workday better in innumerable ways. Among them: your satisfaction will increase while your stress will decrease. You’ll become more empathetic, resilient, and open to opportunities. You’ll find it easier to connect deeply with others, which, in turn, will help you cultivate mutually beneficial relationships that are based on sharing and co-creating.

Sounds great, doesn’t it? It gets better. By extension, your team will also benefit. When you connect with your internal sources of strength, you and the people who work with you will be in a much better position to influence your external environment, instead of the other way around.

Here are six ways to develop your ability to lead from the heart: Click here to continue reading »”6 Internal Sources Of Strength For Leaders To Develop”

2 Techniques That Transform Leadership Communication

Transforming-leadership-communication

The following is a guest piece by Dr. Alan Zimmerman.

It was the most memorable line in the movie Cool Hand Luke. When the prisoners wouldn’t listen, the prison guard uttered that ominous line: “What we have here is a failure to communicate.”

In a similar sense, almost every employee survey complains about a “lack of communication.” Perhaps you work in one of those places.

The good news is: there are two communication makeups that can fix that. One that deals with the quantity of your communication. The other addresses the quality of your communication.

Makeup #1: DNDT Increases The Quantity Of Your Communication

As I speak to various corporate groups, one of the most frequent complaints I hear is “We’re so busy we don’t have time to talk to each other. We’re so focused on our own individual silos that we don’t really know what the other people in our company are doing.”

If that sounds like you, it’s time to implement DNDT or Do Not Disturb Times. Follow these guidelines. Click here to continue reading »”2 Techniques That Transform Leadership Communication”

Do You Motivate By Obligation Or Commitment?

Commitment-vs-obligation

When I sat down to write this latest piece for my leadership blog, I realized that today marks a special anniversary – exactly 6 years ago on this date I took the plunge to begin writing my own blog. Without question, it’s been a long and exhilarating journey both in terms of the evolution of my site as well as in terms of my writing style and approach.

Given that it’s a rare occurrence for this writing anniversary to coincide with the day of the week that I publish my latest articles, I thought this would be a wonderful opportunity to reflect on this writing anniversary and what lessons can be shared from this milestone on how we can do a better job inspiring those we lead to bring their best selves to the work they do.

In looking back on these past 6 years writing for my blog, I’m reminded of the fact that as is the case with writing, leadership is a journey of discovery, one that will help you understand your true value and purpose [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter].

It’s a journey that will often challenge your assumptions of what works, of what it is that truly engages and inspires those around you, and which – if you’re open to learning those lessons – will help you to evolve and grow into the kind of leader your employees and organization needs you to be.

The truth I’ve come to appreciate over the past few years of sharing my thoughts and insights on leadership is that we can’t rely on our sense of obligation – of what people expect from us – to push ourselves to be better than we are today. Rather, what we need is that internally-driven commitment to not settle for the current status quo; that we not look at ourselves today with the belief that we can’t achieve more, or become more than we are right now.

In every successful leader, we see that hunger that compels them to not settle or rest on their laurels, but to keep pushing themselves to achieve even more and in the process, help those around them to become stronger contributors and more valued members of their organization.

These leaders understood that Click here to continue reading »”Do You Motivate By Obligation Or Commitment?”

Building Emotional Competencies In Our Leadership

Building-emotional-competencies-in-leadership

Over the past decade or so, there have been numerous studies and books that have helped us to better appreciate the emotional nature of successful leadership, a fact that has helped to bring about a transformation in leadership attitudes from the old command-and-control approach to one that’s more outward-focused and collaborative.

Unfortunately, while we’ve become more aware about the importance of emotional intelligence in today’s leadership, the truth is many of us continue to grapple with this issue and in the past few years, it has only become worse thanks to the changing realities of leading in today’s faster-paced, 24/7 work environment.

It’s an issue that I’ve addressed in some of the talks I’ve given this year, where I discussed the challenge leaders face of how to balance the increasing pull to simply get things done against that critical need to build and nurture a workplace environment that brings out the best in those they lead.

The necessity and importance of addressing this balancing act can be best appreciated when we consider the findings of a recent American Management Association (AMA) study which found that stress in the workplace is fast becoming the most critical issue organizations face today, with more than 50% of the study’s respondents stating that their organization suffers from above-average stress levels.

The major challenge this workplace issue presents comes from the fact that our ability to address workplace stress depends not on our technical capabilities, but on the emotional competencies we bring to our leadership.

After all, creating an environment where employees thrive is an emotional construct, not a technical one [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter].

It’s also why in today’s current workplace environment, where all of us are being bombarded with increasing demands on our time and attention, we can’t afford to let what gets our attention to determine what we focus on and where we put most of our efforts. Rather, what we need to do is build our emotional competencies to ensure that we are promoting an organizational culture that ensures our collective success, growth, and evolution.

So how can we build our emotional competencies in order to be more successful in guiding our employees towards achieving our vision or shared purpose?

The first critical step we need to take is Click here to continue reading »”Building Emotional Competencies In Our Leadership”

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