TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Credibility Is the Foundation Of Leadership

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For the third part of this month-long series celebrating the release of my first leadership book (which will be available in bookstores and online retailers next Thursday, September 25th), “Leadership Vertigo”, co-written with S. Max Brown, I’m delighted and honoured to welcome James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner, authors of the international best-seller and groundbreaking leadership book, “The Leadership Challenge”, to my blog. In this special guest piece, Jim and Barry discuss the 3rd leadership principle from the book, “Earn Credibility”, by sharing findings from several of their studies as to why credibility is so critical to our ability to effectively lead our employees and organization.

Jim and Barry, it is truly a pleasure and an honour to have you both sharing your research, knowledge, and insights with my readers. I’m grateful to you both for being so supportive and encouraging of my writings on leadership over these past couple of years. You inspire me to recognize that this book is just the beginning, and that there’s not only another book waiting for me to write, but that there’s more that I can share and give back to the leadership community to help leaders to “love ‘em and lead ‘em”.

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“I did not readily admit to my friends where I worked,” Lisa Kelley (not her real name) told us. “I just used to say, ‘A big company.’” The reason, she said, “predominantly had to do with the fact that I did not believe that our leaders were acting with the integrity and honesty that I hold so dear to my heart. I did not feel management set the kind of example that I wanted to abide by.”

Lisa’s sentiment is one that we hear time and time again. People want to believe in their leaders and in the organizations in which they work. When they don’t, they are unlikely to want to follow or do their best work.

For over thirty years we’ve been asking people to tell us what they look for and admire in a leader, someone whose direction they would willingly follow (the key word here is willingly.) The results of our studies over these three decades have been strikingly consistent around the world, and across categories of age, gender, ethnicity, functional discipline, and organizational level.

People are exceedingly clear about the qualities they expect leaders to demonstrate before they will enlist in a common cause and freely commit to action.

What are these crucial attributes? According to our research, people most want their leaders to be honest, forward-looking, competent, and inspiring. These four characteristics rank well above any others, and they are the only four that have been selected consistently by over sixty percent of respondents. Click here to continue reading »”Credibility Is the Foundation Of Leadership”

Leadership Vertigo – Understanding Why Leaders Go Off Course

Leadership Vertigo - Tanveer Naseer 1st leadership book

When you write about leadership for a number of years, and especially when you receive numerous awards and recognitions for your writings and insights on leadership, it’s only natural that one of the questions you’re often asked is ‘when are you going to write a book?’ This has certainly been the case on my end – in fact, I recall one conversation I had with a friend of mine almost a year ago where in an off-the-cuff moment, he said “Tanveer, you know you have a book in you, right?”

To see such interest and demand for my writings in this larger format has certainly been gratifying, all the more so now that I have this very special news to announce (something I’m sure will put a big smile on my friend’s face, if not also hearing him say ‘I knew it!’).

Given how this blog and its readers have been the key driving force behind this pursuit, it’s only natural for me to announce here publicly the news of the release of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo: Why Even the Best Leaders Go Off Course and How They Can Get Back On Track”, which will be available in bookstores and online retailers on Thursday, September 25th.

To learn more about where you can pre-order or purchase this book online – both for my Canadian/US readers, as well as those outside North America – please check out this brand new leadership book page I created on my website. On this information page, you’ll not only find links to buy my book at some of the major online retailers, but you can also read some of the wonderful and generous advance praise my book has received.

Of course, when you tell people you have a book coming out, a new common question arises – what’s your book about? In this piece, I’d like to share with you the answer to that question.

What is Leadership Vertigo?

When I’ve told my inner circle of friends and colleagues the name of my new leadership book, naturally, the first question I get asked is “what is leadership vertigo?”. To answer this succinctly (you can get the more detailed answer in the book), leadership vertigo refers to the gap in perception between how we view our leadership and how those we lead experience it. Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Vertigo – Understanding Why Leaders Go Off Course”

How To Promote Continuous Learning In Your Organization

Leadership continuous learning environment

“The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.”

– William Arthur Ward

When it comes to effectively leading teams and organizations in today’s fast-paced, 24/7 global economy, it’s becoming more and more evident that the days of command-and-control leadership are well behind us. That – to paraphrase the quote above – organizations need leaders who don’t just explain or demonstrate the relevance of their vision to those they lead. Rather, what organizations require are leaders who can inspire employees to commit themselves wholeheartedly to making this vision a reality.

It’s a recurring theme found in some of the talks I’ve given this year, going from my keynote speech given at a leadership conference in Chicago last month to my next presentation in Utah in September: that as leaders, we need to do more than simply paint grand visions of the future; we also have to provide an environment where our employees can see the opportunity to grow, evolve, and help build the kind of future that they want to be a part of.

As I prepare for my talk next month on how leaders can help their organizations to shift from relying solely on training programs to promoting a continuous learning environment, I’d like to share the following 3 measures to provide some insights on how you can do the same in your organization.

1. Encourage your employees to challenge their assumptions
One of the first things we have to do to promote continuous learning in our organization is to encourage our employees to challenge their assumptions of their capabilities as well as of what’s possible. To understand the importance of this step to creating a continuous learning environment, we need to first understand how our brain performs tasks.

When our brain performs tasks or makes decisions, it not only taps into the Click here to continue reading »”How To Promote Continuous Learning In Your Organization”

One CEO’s Reflections On Measuring Impact And Purpose

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The following is a guest piece by Daniel Patrick Forrester.

Over the last ten years I have seen a movement happening within for-profit organizations. They are moving towards including a social impact agenda within their purpose as a company. Which is groundbreaking for society! I can think of no greater time in history to advance our society then by for-profit social impact investing.

For- profit organizations are reflecting upon their current value proposition and looking to dig deeper by bringing meaning into the workplace and world. They are seeking to answer the questions, “why do we exist?” and “does our presence in the world mean something beyond our establishment?”

For-profit leaders looking to develop an advantageous social impact strategy should simply turn towards looking at successful non-for-profits for guidance. The space between data and meaning is a constant battle for organizations of all size to measure.

One differentiator I see in purpose driven non-profit organizations is they are excellent at stepping back and measuring the value of impact. Data is great, but it’s not the “end-all be-all” in measuring impact.

In my experience, impact is frequently understated within organizations; it often Click here to continue reading »”One CEO’s Reflections On Measuring Impact And Purpose”

3 Valuable Insights Leaders Can Learn From Neuroscience

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The following is a guest piece by Jesse Newton and Josh Davis.

If you’re trying to instill organizational change in your company, then you face not just a logistical shift, but a cultural challenge as well. Employees will have to think differently, see people differently, and act in new ways. Employees also need to continually reinforce the right habits in one another so that the customer experience is on their minds everywhere.

One method that can help is known as pride building. This is a cultural intervention in which leaders seek out a few employees who are already known to be master motivators, adept at inspiring strategic awareness among their colleagues. These master motivators are invited to recommend specific measures that enable better ways of working.

Pride builders in a wide variety of companies and industries tend to recommend three specific measures time and time again: (1) giving more autonomy to frontline workers, (2) clearly explaining to staff members the significance and Click here to continue reading »”3 Valuable Insights Leaders Can Learn From Neuroscience”

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