TanveerNaseer.com

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

How To Encourage Growth Under A Controlling Boss

Dealing-with-controlling-boss

One of the things I enjoy about my work is having conversations with people about the nature of leadership, and the challenges and opportunities leaders face in this continually evolving, interconnected business environment.

One of these conversations lead to a discussion about how leaders who want to push for change can deal with those above them who operate from the command-and-control style of leadership – in other words, those that subscribe to the overtly-controlling it’s my way or you’re out approach.

Since that conversation, I’ve had the opportunity to discuss and learn about how both employees and other leaders are also grappling with this organizational schism of dealing with someone stuck in an Industrial Age mindset of top-down leadership, while having to address today’s challenges and issues which require a more collaborative, inclusive and open workplace dynamic.

Based on these conversations, I’d like to share the following three measures that can help both employees and leaders who have to deal with a controlling boss who is clearly stuck in the ‘this is the way things are done around here’ mindset to ensure that they are able to promote growth and collective success in their organization.

1. Don’t focus on your value but on the value you can create
One of the common issues I hear when I discuss with clients and colleagues this issue of working for a controlling boss – especially those that operate from a top-down, win-at-all-costs leadership mindset – is how they feel like they’re more a means to an end than a valued contributor to their organization.

In discussing this situation, one thing that becomes clear is that both parties are almost speaking a different language in terms of their perspective and perception. For employees, their focus is on how to get those in charge to see them as being something more than what they do. For controlling bosses, however, their focus is simply on what they want their employees to get done in order to obtain their desired end result, regardless of the impact or impression that leaves on those under their care.

To resolve this difference in focus and attitudes, we need to Click here to continue reading »”How To Encourage Growth Under A Controlling Boss”

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #15 – Tanveer Naseer On Overcoming Leadership Vertigo

Leadership-Biz-Cafe-Tanveer-Naseer

With so many books, articles, and studies on how leaders can be more effective guiding their teams in today’s faster-paced, global environment, why do leaders still struggle to help their organizations to succeed? That’s the basis of the conversation in this VERY special episode of Leadership Biz Cafe which wraps up the month-long celebration of the release of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo”.

In this special episode of my show, I’m delighted to hand over hosting duties to my friend David Burkus, author of “The Myths of Creativity” and host of the leadership podcast show, LDRLB, so he can interview me about my new book, as well as asking about my future plans, including a discussion about my next leadership book.

Over the course of this discussion, David and I discuss:

  • What is leadership vertigo and how does it impact leaders in today’s organizations.
  • Understanding one of the key challenges organizations face in terms of balancing leadership development and retaining key talent.
  • What Martin Luther King, Jr. and Nelson Mandela help us to understand about the importance of community and why it’s necessary to rallying employees around our vision or long-term objectives.
  • My experience with a public transit janitor on the Chicago L-Train and what his actions reveal about the true nature of credibility in leadership.
  • What’s next in store for me, including a discussion of what the focus of my next leadership book will be.

As David mentions at the end of this special episode, I’d love to hear what you think about this conversation about my first leadership book, as well as hearing what other topics this might spur your interest in learning more about in future episodes of my show. To do so, please leave me a comment below or fill out the contact form found on my website.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast: Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #15 – Tanveer Naseer On Overcoming Leadership Vertigo”

Credibility Is the Foundation Of Leadership

Credibility-leadership-vertigo

For the third part of this month-long series celebrating the release of my first leadership book (which will be available in bookstores and through online retailers), “Leadership Vertigo”, I’m delighted and honoured to welcome James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner, authors of the international best-seller and groundbreaking leadership book, “The Leadership Challenge”, to my blog. In this special guest piece, Jim and Barry discuss the 3rd leadership principle from the book, “Earn Credibility”, by sharing findings from several of their studies as to why credibility is so critical to our ability to effectively lead our employees and organization.

Jim and Barry, it is truly a pleasure and an honour to have you both sharing your research, knowledge, and insights with my readers. I’m grateful to you both for being so supportive and encouraging of my writings on leadership over these past couple of years. You inspire me to recognize that this book is just the beginning, and that there’s not only another book waiting for me to write, but that there’s more that I can share and give back to the leadership community to help leaders to “love ‘em and lead ‘em”.

* * * * *

“I did not readily admit to my friends where I worked,” Lisa Kelley (not her real name) told us. “I just used to say, ‘A big company.’” The reason, she said, “predominantly had to do with the fact that I did not believe that our leaders were acting with the integrity and honesty that I hold so dear to my heart. I did not feel management set the kind of example that I wanted to abide by.”

Lisa’s sentiment is one that we hear time and time again. People want to believe in their leaders and in the organizations in which they work. When they don’t, they are unlikely to want to follow or do their best work.

For over thirty years we’ve been asking people to tell us what they look for and admire in a leader, someone whose direction they would willingly follow (the key word here is willingly.) The results of our studies over these three decades have been strikingly consistent around the world, and across categories of age, gender, ethnicity, functional discipline, and organizational level.

People are exceedingly clear about the qualities they expect leaders to demonstrate before they will enlist in a common cause and freely commit to action.

What are these crucial attributes? According to our research, people most want their leaders to be honest, forward-looking, competent, and inspiring. These four characteristics rank well above any others, and they are the only four that have been selected consistently by over sixty percent of respondents. Click here to continue reading »”Credibility Is the Foundation Of Leadership”

How To Promote Continuous Learning In Your Organization

Leadership continuous learning environment

“The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.”

– William Arthur Ward

When it comes to effectively leading teams and organizations in today’s fast-paced, 24/7 global economy, it’s becoming more and more evident that the days of command-and-control leadership are well behind us. That – to paraphrase the quote above – organizations need leaders who don’t just explain or demonstrate the relevance of their vision to those they lead. Rather, what organizations require are leaders who can inspire employees to commit themselves wholeheartedly to making this vision a reality.

It’s a recurring theme found in some of the talks I’ve given this year, going from my keynote speech given at a leadership conference in Chicago last month to my next presentation in Utah in September: that as leaders, we need to do more than simply paint grand visions of the future; we also have to provide an environment where our employees can see the opportunity to grow, evolve, and help build the kind of future that they want to be a part of.

As I prepare for my talk next month on how leaders can help their organizations to shift from relying solely on training programs to promoting a continuous learning environment, I’d like to share the following 3 measures to provide some insights on how you can do the same in your organization.

1. Encourage your employees to challenge their assumptions
One of the first things we have to do to promote continuous learning in our organization is to encourage our employees to challenge their assumptions of their capabilities as well as of what’s possible. To understand the importance of this step to creating a continuous learning environment, we need to first understand how our brain performs tasks.

When our brain performs tasks or makes decisions, it not only taps into the Click here to continue reading »”How To Promote Continuous Learning In Your Organization”

How Vacation Time Can Make You A Better Leader

Taking-vacation-to-become-better-leader

When you’ve been writing a blog for 5 years as I have starting this month, one of the things you appreciate as being a key factor behind your longevity in this sphere is the importance of taking a vacation break to employ the 3 R’s – rest, review, and reflection.

Of course, it’s not just the art of writing that benefits from taking time off for rest and relaxation to keep improving your craft. As leaders, it’s critical that we’re also taking vacation breaks from leading our team and organization in order to ensure that we’re consistently offering our best to those we lead.

So as I prepare for my annual sojourn, I’d like to share with you these four reasons why taking a vacation will help you to become a more effective leader for those under your care.

1. Vacation breaks give you time to reflect and review
One of the things many of the leaders I’ve worked and spoken with share in common is how they enjoy being able to spend time on ‘big-picture thinking’, where they consider current realities and situations, and what opportunities lie ahead that their organization should invest time and resources to explore.

Unfortunately, while this is an important requirement for effectively leading organizations in today’s interconnected, global economy, one of the realities leaders find themselves grappling with is managing the growing demands for their time and attention in this 24/7 wired world.

The work routines employed by many of these leaders leave them operating more in a reactive, instead of reflective mode, so spending any time on pondering the long-view can seem almost like a luxury.

Indeed, many of the leaders I’ve worked with have expressed this common frustration in spending so much of their days dealing with putting out fires or addressing day-to-day issues that they admit feeling a disconnect between where they spend most of their time and attention, and what they want to achieve through their leadership.

And if the leaders of these organizations feel this disconnect, it doesn’t take much for us to appreciate what realities their employees must be operating within in how their approach their own work.

That’s why it’s so important that we take time off work to Click here to continue reading »”How Vacation Time Can Make You A Better Leader”

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