Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #21 – Tim Sanders On Why Bizlove Is Critical For Today’s Leadership

NYT bestselling author and former executive Tim Sanders on why bizlove is critical to our ability to succeed at leadership and how we can tap into this power in 3 simple steps.

When it comes to our leadership, how generous are we with the knowledge we have and the people we know in terms of helping others to succeed? And why is this so critical to our ability to succeed as leaders? That’s the focus of my conversation with best-selling author and former executive Tim Sanders.

Tim is a New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and former Yahoo Chief Solutions Officer. Tim has been featured in Fast Company, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and ABC news. His approach to leadership and business is simple – share what you know and who know you to help others succeed, and do so with compassion towards others. Its those very principles that are the focus of Tim’s New York Times best-selling book – and the focus of our discussion in this episode – “Love Is The Killer App: How To Win Business & Influence Friends”.

Over the course of our conversation, Tim shares a number of fascinating insights and stories, including:

  • Bizlove is having a genuine desire to see others succeed without expecting anything in return. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Too often we focus on the wrong people: on those who boost our ego instead of those we truly helped. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Use gratitude to drive you forward, but don’t treat it as your sole motivator for helping others – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • When you’re generous and effective at growing other people, people will follow you. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Caring leaders are more able to get their employees to take action than leaders who don’t care. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]

There are, of course, many more fascinating and thought-provoking insights shared during this episode – it’s just that some can’t fit into 140 characters or they’re just so much more enjoyable to learn hearing them from Tim himself. This episode also features a number of fun and insightful stories, including a reading trick my middle daughter Malaika – whose not much of a book-reader – uses to capture and recall information she reads in books assigned for school.

As I mentioned at the end of this episode, I’d love to hear what you think about this episode, as well as what other topics you’d be interested in hearing more about in upcoming episodes of my show. Please share your thoughts and ideas by leaving a comment below or by filling out the contact form on my website.

I’d also appreciate it if you could rate my show on Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or iTunes to help support future episodes of this leadership podcast.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast:

[Running time: 54 minutes]

Noteworthy links:

  • Buy Tim Sanders’ book “Love Is The Killer App” on Amazon.com (or Amazon.ca for Canadian readers).
  • Check out the special Leadership Biz Cafe webpage on Tim’s website featuring exclusive content for my listeners at TimSanders.com/LBC.
  • Learn more about Tim’s work and her writings at TimSanders.com.

Comments » | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | July 18, 2017 by |

9 Strategies Of Uncommon Wisdom For Fuelling Top Performance

Learn about 9 strategies leaders can employ that are key to achieving top performance in the organization.

The following is a guest piece by Larry Sternberg.

Fuelling top performance is the goal for most leaders and managers. The best managers know their people are the key to achieving top performance on every metric of success they track. As a leader or manager, how can you make the biggest difference through leveraging the talents and efforts of the people on your team? This handful of specific strategies can help.

1. Accept People As They Are
Your job as a manager is not to change people. Your job is to optimize people’s performance. Start by accepting people as they are. The old adage applies here: Marry as is, and consider any change a bonus.

Select people for your team who have the right mix of strengths, knowledge and potential. Focus on what’s right with people instead of what’s wrong with them. Optimize the alignment between what people bring to the table and what you need your team to achieve. And, be prepared to tolerate some undesirable behaviors — because they are part of the package.

2. Emphasize the Why
Consider the story of three people laying bricks. When asked, “What are you doing?” One person replies, “I’m laying bricks.” The second person says, “I’m part of a team building a really big brick wall.” The third person replies, “I’m just one of many people working together here to build a cathedral where people will get married, christen their babies and lay their loved ones to rest.” Which of these people do you think is most motivated to do great work?

Help people advance from what to why so they see their work as Click here to continue reading »

4 Comments » | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | July 11, 2017 by |

4 Disciplines For Long-Term Sustainability Of Change

Learn about 4 measures leaders can employ to generate and sustain momentum in any change initiative to ensure long-term sustainability in their change effort.

The following is a guest piece by R. Kendall Lyman and Tony C. Daloisio.

Years ago, we each had a chance individually, to take a hot air balloon ride. Kendall’s adventure was fun and exhilarating. But for Tony, his ride was terrifying because of his fear of heights and small places. The thought of being thousands of feet in the air in a small basket was petrifying. After comparing our two experiences, we realized how similar our adventures were to how change affects employees.

Some employees are excited about the idea of change; others are terrified. Some find the ride exhilarating, while others find it paralyzing. Some people will jump right in the basket and look forward to the journey and the destination. Others will have to be slowly coaxed into the basket and constantly reminded about why they are there in the first place and where they are going.

Achieving meaningful change takes significant strategy and effort, and an investment in time. It requires generating enough lift to enable the change to float while avoiding things that create drag. And what we’ve learned over the last twenty-five years of implementing change projects is that the work doesn’t end when you’ve reached your goal.

Rather, leaders must continue to work at change, reinforcing the progress made to ensure its sustainability.

To generate lift and sustain change, engage in the following disciplines which are designed to ensure your success. Click here to continue reading »

2 Comments » | Tags: , , , , , , , | June 27, 2017 by |

Listen Up! 5 Ways To Improve Your Leadership Listening Skills

Learn about 5 strategies leaders can employ to improve their leadership listening skills.

The following is a guest piece by Jackie Edwards.

Are you part of the 25 per cent of leaders who aren’t really listening to their employees? It could be harming your reputation and career. Even though you might have great analytical skills and intelligence, not listening properly decreases the effectiveness of your leadership role.

Become a better listener and everyone wins: your employees feel part of a team and you can lead them to success.

There are some simple yet effective ways you can become a better listener. Try to exercise the following skills on a daily basis. Click here to continue reading »

2 Comments » | Tags: , , , , , , | June 20, 2017 by |

4 Steps To Becoming More Inquisitive As Leaders

Learn about 4 steps any leader can take to help them become inquisitive in order to bring out the best from those they lead.

In my previous piece, where I shared the story of how a past leadership failure helped me to learn to become a better listener, I pointed out that one of the keys to effective leadership is learning to be more inquisitive.

Now the importance of inquisitiveness in today’s leadership is fairly obvious considering how much faster we have to operate and make decisions, if not also how quickly things can change.

That’s where we gain the benefits from being more inquisitive, and not just in gaining clarity regarding the challenges and opportunities before us, but also in how this simple conversation tool helps to nurture and strengthen relationships with those we lead.

So how do we become more inquisitive in our leadership? Here are 4 steps to help you get started:

1. Ask open-ended questions that require more than a yes/no response
If there’s one thing leaders everywhere share in common it’s working within an environment where they face increasing demands on their time and attention, while at the same being expected to make decisions as quickly as possible.

Taken together, these factors create conditions where it’s easy for leaders to resort to asking questions that require only a yes/no answer. While these answers can help us act quickly, the problem is that they lack context or insights that can help us make more effective decisions and choices going forward.

Asking open-ended questions – like asking ‘what did our customer say?’ instead of ‘is our customer happy?’ – not only provides greater context, but it encourages a genuine engagement with those we lead, over interactions that are merely transactional in nature.

After all, the questions we ask shape not only our conversations, but the relationships we have with others [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

2. Be curious to find out what others know
While inquisitiveness is something we need to work at – especially in light of Click here to continue reading »

Comments » | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | June 13, 2017 by |
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