Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2017

A look back at my Top 10 leadership insights from 2017 and what they reveal about how leaders can be successful in the year ahead.

With the New Year now well under way, many of us are understandably creating goals and developing plans for what we’d like to achieve over the course of the next 12 months. For myself, the start of a New Year also presents a unique opportunity to look back on the past 52 weeks to see which of my writings resonated the most with my readers.

It’s an interesting exercise because it not only lets me know what ideas and topics garner the most interest and engagement from my audience, but it also reveals some interesting patterns about what’s on the forefront on the minds of today’s leaders.

Perhaps most interestingly is the fact that – as was the case for the my top leadership insight in 2016 – the top leadership insight I shared last year came from a piece that revolved around a personal story of mine and the lessons I learned of how to be more effective in how to lead and serve those under our care.

In fact, the second most popular leadership insight also came from a personal experience, in this case from one of my daughters who took on her first leadership role last year and what that experience taught her about what it really takes to successfully lead others.

So, I’m definitely going to keep that in mind when it comes to what I plan on writing and sharing here on my leadership blog over the course of the next 12 months to come.

In the meantime, here are my Top 10 leadership insights of 2017 as chosen by you, the readers of my award-winning leadership blog. Enjoy!

Leadership Insight #10 – Becoming a leader is not about promoting yourself; it’s about helping others to succeed and thrive [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

“Bringing this kind of intentionality to how we develop and support leaders is important, not only to how organizations select who will join the leadership ranks within their workplace, but in how our employees view and understand what they should expect from those in charge.

Indeed, as much as it’s critical for today’s leaders to create an environment where employees are internally driven to bring their best efforts to the work they do, it’s incumbent on those in senior leadership positions to ensure that they are providing the right guidance and support for those who will one day take their place at the helm.”

Read more on this leadership insight here: Are You Supporting Your Organization’s New Leaders To Succeed?

Leadership Insight #9 – The power to inspire others exists in all of us. We just have to choose to be present to use it [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

“To illustrate what I mean by this, think about any leader who you look to as a source of inspiration. No doubt they’ve Click here to continue reading »”My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2017″

What Will You Do To Make Next Year Better?

An end-of-year reminder for leaders to look beyond hope as a driver to fuel change in the New Year by focusing on what really propels people forward to change.

With just a few days left on the calendar, the time has once again arrived for that annual event of compiling retrospectives for the year that was. Whether it’s highlighting the top moments, the major trends, a look back at the various talented people who passed away this year, compiling and cataloguing what transpired over the past 12 months has become a standard feature of our contemporary lives.

Of course, these lists of the top moments of the past year invariably lead to much being written about what a bad year 2017 turned out to be, and of our hopes that 2018 will be better. It’s in these moments that I enjoy being a writer because in many ways, our writings allow us to travel back in time, peeling back the days, weeks, and months so as to revisit past perceptions and anticipations for what might come.

In looking back at what I wrote at the end of 2016, it was interesting to see how 2016 was regarded by many to be ‘a bad year’ and how there was all this hope for 2017 being a fresh start to change and improve things.

While most of us might not recall what made 2016 not such a great year, there’s little doubt that this year will not go down in our collective human history as being one of our finest moments in time.

With a rise in hate towards various racial, ethnic, and minority groups in parts of Europe and North America, the growing fear of a potential nuclear war alongside rising tensions in the Middle East, the onslaught of stories revealing the seemingly ubiquitous presence of sexual harassment and violence women endure in many of today’s workplaces, as well as uncertainties on the economic front has certainly left a bad taste for the year that was.

And yet, the simple truth is we’ve been here before. Perhaps in some ways, this is a product of the faster-paced, always-on nature of our digital society. That we inevitably feel this fatigue when reaching that one-year mark, fatigue which manifests itself in this hopeful expectation that a mere change in the calendar year will spring forth better times.

While there’s certainly nothing wrong with being hopeful, the fact is hope alone is not enough. Without question, our world is facing many critical issues, some of which can seem too daunting for us to address, let alone overcome.

But as many of us prepare for the impending arrival of a new year as a key motivator for change, we must reconcile with this truth:

We have a choice of letting change simply happen to us, or to adapt and learn from it to be stronger going forward [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

Sure, we’ve all seen examples of our fellow citizens being at their worst, of succumbing to their fear of those different from them and spreading hate and fear in response. We’ve seen political opportunism take hold where politicians seem more interested in defending their behaviours and actions, instead of honouring their responsibility to first and foremost serve the best interests of every person who falls under their leadership.

But, at the same time, we’ve seen Click here to continue reading »”What Will You Do To Make Next Year Better?”

Do You Have The Courage To Change How You Lead?

Leading change is more than a process; it's a journey that challenges our understandings and opens up new insights and perspectives.

If there’s one constant to doing business in today’s global environment, it’s that things inevitably change.

Of course, when it comes to change in today’s organizations, more often than not it’s sorted into one of two boxes – change that drives our efforts towards innovation, or change that we have to manage in response to fluid conditions in our market space.

In my work, I get many leaders who want to discuss the latter condition – of how to manage change that comes with the changing needs of your customers, the changing needs of what you need to attract and retain employees, and the changing needs of how you’re supposed to lead in an increasingly multi-generational and diverse workforce.

In many of these conversations, it becomes clear that what these leaders are after is a playbook – a straightforward, step-by-step process of how to get through this “change initiative” quickly, so that they can shift their focus back to the work that they view as being ‘the real and important work’.

But change is not simply another item on your To-Do list. Indeed, dealing with change is more than a process; it’s an on-going journey of exploration and discovery [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

This is that roadblock that impedes so many of us from taking those critical first steps in this journey of change. As there’s no guaranteed notion of what awaits us, how can we be sure it’s worth opening the door to see what’s on the other side?

As such, the question we face is do we have the courage to change, not just today, but as we move forward? [Twitter logoShare on Twitter] Will we treat change not merely as something we’re willing to do today, but as something we’ll embrace going forward as new realities sharpen into focus as we continue on our journey towards achieving our long-term goals?

Of course, sometimes we might not feel as though we have a choice, especially in those moments when Click here to continue reading »”Do You Have The Courage To Change How You Lead?”

7 Steps To Becoming A Happier, Higher-Performing Leader

Discover 7 steps that can help leaders build habits that will help them not only become higher-performing leaders, but happier ones too.

The following is a guest piece by Jennifer Moss.

From growing a successful start-up, to writing a book and speaking internationally about workplace culture, to making a solid attempt at being a decent wife and mother of three kids; I require an enormous amount of mental bandwidth. I’m sure many of you reading this blog are in the same boat.

But, my question to you is: Are you building the right habits? The kind of habits that make you happier, more emotionally intelligent? The kind of habits that build up your psychological fitness so you can emulate positive and empathetic leadership?

We tend to think that healthy habits are correlated to better eating or working out. But, what if I told you that emotional healthiness is the precursor to improved physical health and higher performance at work and in life. Good mental health habits free up space in the conscious decision-making area of the brain so you better attend to other priorities. As a leader, this is enormously helpful.

To ensure I formed new and improved current leadership habits, I developed a standard for building habits that stick. The P.E.R.S.I.S.T. model is based on existing research correlated to well-being and performance. This model continues to support my personal development routine and hopefully, it can support your efforts as well: Click here to continue reading »”7 Steps To Becoming A Happier, Higher-Performing Leader”

4 Disciplines For Long-Term Sustainability Of Change

Learn about 4 measures leaders can employ to generate and sustain momentum in any change initiative to ensure long-term sustainability in their change effort.

The following is a guest piece by R. Kendall Lyman and Tony C. Daloisio.

Years ago, we each had a chance individually, to take a hot air balloon ride. Kendall’s adventure was fun and exhilarating. But for Tony, his ride was terrifying because of his fear of heights and small places. The thought of being thousands of feet in the air in a small basket was petrifying. After comparing our two experiences, we realized how similar our adventures were to how change affects employees.

Some employees are excited about the idea of change; others are terrified. Some find the ride exhilarating, while others find it paralyzing. Some people will jump right in the basket and look forward to the journey and the destination. Others will have to be slowly coaxed into the basket and constantly reminded about why they are there in the first place and where they are going.

Achieving meaningful change takes significant strategy and effort, and an investment in time. It requires generating enough lift to enable the change to float while avoiding things that create drag. And what we’ve learned over the last twenty-five years of implementing change projects is that the work doesn’t end when you’ve reached your goal.

Rather, leaders must continue to work at change, reinforcing the progress made to ensure its sustainability.

To generate lift and sustain change, engage in the following disciplines which are designed to ensure your success. Click here to continue reading »”4 Disciplines For Long-Term Sustainability Of Change”

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