Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #20 – Lolly Daskal On What’s Stopping Leaders From Achieving Greatness

Learn from leadership expert Lolly Daskal why some of us get stuck in our leadership and how we can overcome this inner hurdle towards achieving our own greatness.

As leaders, how aware are we of the obstacles we create for ourselves that impede our ability to achieve our own form of greatness? That’s the question that served as the basis of my conversation with my fellow leadership expert and friend, Lolly Daskal.

Lolly is the president and CEO of Lead From Within, a global consultancy that specializes in leadership and entrepreneurial development.

Lolly is also a prolific writer, not only creating regular content for her award-winning leadership blog, but she also writes a column for Inc.com and Psychology Today, as well as having her work appear in the Harvard Business Review and Fast Company. Although she’s the recipient of numerous awards and accolades, the one that probably best describes Lolly is something The Huffington Post once wrote about her, calling her “The Most Inspiring Woman in The World”.

For our conversation, Lolly and I discuss her new book called “The Leadership Gap: What Gets Between You and Your Greatness”.

In addition to a fascinating discussion on the nature of nature of intuition and why we follow (and should follow) our gut instincts, Lolly shares a number of interesting insights on leadership, including: Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #20 – Lolly Daskal On What’s Stopping Leaders From Achieving Greatness”

4 Keys For Bringing Out The Best From Introverts

Learn about 4 steps organizations can take to tap into the full potential of introverted employees found in their workforce.

The following is a guest piece by Kate Rodriguez.

One of the hottest themes in management and leadership today is the importance of understanding the introvert at work.

The idea that workplaces reward extroverts has been around for a while. Discussions on the differences between those with outward-looking personalities (extroverts) versus those with inward tendencies (introverts) has been around for years – the concept was introduced by psychiatrist Carl Jung in 1921 – but it has reached fever pitch since the 2012 release of the book “Quiet” by Susan Cain, which asserts that introverts are dramatically undervalued and organisations suffer as a result.

Research points out that while nearly half the population is introverted, extroverts hold the majority of leadership roles. “The research I’ve done shows that about 25 to 30 percent of CEOs are introverts,” explains Karl Moore, associate professor of strategy and organization at Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University. This indicates there are also a significant number of introverts leading extroverts and not just the other way around, as the research tends to suppose.

Professional roles of introverts vs. extroverts

Introverts and extroverts tend to migrate to career fields that play to their dispositions, says Moore. People-facing jobs, like sales, management consulting and investment banking are dominated by extroverts. Introverts alternatively often move into Click here to continue reading »”4 Keys For Bringing Out The Best From Introverts”

Why Leaders Should Depersonalize Communication

Researchers have found leaders are more effective in how they communicate when they depersonalize the message. Learn what this means and how to do it.

The following is a guest piece by Dr. Derek Roger and Nick Petrie.

It’s not what you do, it’s the way that you do it

Talking comes so naturally to us we tend to forget just how much skill is involved. Even when we’re speaking fast, every word is selected as the appropriate one, from a huge collection we have stored in our brains. We weren’t born with language; all the words, and the rules governing them, had to be learned.

Spoken language, together with the gestures to go with what we’re saying, are what constitutes communication. It is at the heart of what it means to be human, but it all goes wrong when we’re less selective about when, how and what we communicate.

Let’s use a simple illustrative example, from the world of work: you’ve just completed a short proposal for a contract, a task you haven’t done before, and your boss is reading through it. How does she respond? The reply you’re likely to dread, especially if this all takes place in front of your colleagues, is along the lines of “You’ve done a pretty bad job of this. Didn’t they teach you anything at college?”

Unfortunately, feedback to direct reports often carries this kind of blaming tone, and it is hardly surprising that so many engagement surveys highlight the negative effects of poor communication. One solution is to provide communication skills training, but the negative ratings often persist.

The reason is that the principles of conventional communication skills programs may be quite ambiguous. Eye-contact is an example: the rule is that you should maintain eye-contact for a certain percentage of the time, to indicate continued interest, but if it’s maintained for too long the conversation starts to feel like an interrogation!

On the other hand, if you’re conveying complex information, people might break eye-contact because they’re reflecting on what you’ve said, not because they aren’t attending.

Listen, just wake up!

So what can be done to improve communication skills? Click here to continue reading »”Why Leaders Should Depersonalize Communication”

How Do You Inspire Others Through Your Leadership?

Most leaders look for role models to inspire how they lead. But it's also important for leaders to consider how to inspire those they lead.

As a people person, I always enjoy visiting new places and new cities as it provides the opportunity to meet new people and spark new conversations, some of which can lead to some very thought-provoking discussions.

For example, a few weeks ago, I meet with a group of leaders to exchange ideas on the growing challenges found in today’s increasingly uncertain global business environment. During this event, I had a one-on-one conversation with one of those leaders, a discussion which began with that typical starting point of sharing our respective stories of what lead us to the work we do today.

When I shared insights based on some of my recent writings on leadership, this leader asked me an intriguing question – ‘how do I go about inspiring others?’

Now many of us have examples of successful leaders who we look up to for inspiration and insight into how we can succeed in the endeavour of leading others. I’ve often been asked which leaders I gain inspiration from and while there are many examples, the ones I often cite are Nelson Mandela and Walt Disney.

But the interesting thing about this particular question is that it shifts our focus inwards onto ourselves in order to examine what we’re creating through our own leadership. That we move beyond simply evaluating our leadership in terms of various established metrics like goal achievement, productivity, and efficiency ratings, in order to ask ourselves what seeds are we planting in the hearts and minds of those we lead?

In other words, the question becomes less about who inspires us and shifts towards answering how are we inspiring those around us through our own actions and words?

As my conversation with this leader continued, it became clear that this was the concern he was having. Although he had facts and figures that proved he was helping his team to reach various assigned targets, he didn’t know if he was inspiring his employees the way his leadership heroes had inspired him. And what’s more, he admitted that he honestly didn’t know where to begin.

Granted, this query can seem to be a bit conceited. After all, if we think about those leadership figures we all admire and look up to, there’s a clear and undeniable reason why they’ve earned our respect and admiration.

And yet, there’s one question that revolves around every individual we look to as a source of inspiration and guidance for today’s leaders – do we see them as inspiring leaders because they achieved extraordinary things, or is it because they Click here to continue reading »”How Do You Inspire Others Through Your Leadership?”

10 Steps To Accelerate Meetings And Drive Productivity

Learn about 10 steps leaders can employ to improve meeting efficiency and drive productivity in their organization.

The following is a guest piece by Jack Zenger and Joesph Folkman.

It is estimated that 15% to 28% of every manager’s workweek is spent in meetings. One of the most frequent written complaints people make about their bosses is the quality of their meetings.

Complaints range from meetings with no agenda, lack of clear purpose for each agenda topic, no advance information nor background materials, lack of making a decision, absence of any follow-through and the plodding, snail’s pace of the meeting.

A leader with accelerated speed and pace greatly increases the likelihood of a productive meeting. Our research on productivity improvement shows high correlation of improved productivity with the efficiency and effectiveness of meetings.

How to Accelerate Meetings Click here to continue reading »”10 Steps To Accelerate Meetings And Drive Productivity”

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