Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #21 – Tim Sanders On Why Bizlove Is Critical For Today’s Leadership

NYT bestselling author and former executive Tim Sanders on why bizlove is critical to our ability to succeed at leadership and how we can tap into this power in 3 simple steps.

When it comes to our leadership, how generous are we with the knowledge we have and the people we know in terms of helping others to succeed? And why is this so critical to our ability to succeed as leaders? That’s the focus of my conversation with best-selling author and former executive Tim Sanders.

Tim is a New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and former Yahoo Chief Solutions Officer. Tim has been featured in Fast Company, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and ABC news. His approach to leadership and business is simple – share what you know and who know you to help others succeed, and do so with compassion towards others. Its those very principles that are the focus of Tim’s New York Times best-selling book – and the focus of our discussion in this episode – “Love Is The Killer App: How To Win Business & Influence Friends”.

Over the course of our conversation, Tim shares a number of fascinating insights and stories, including:

  • Bizlove is having a genuine desire to see others succeed without expecting anything in return. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Too often we focus on the wrong people: on those who boost our ego instead of those we truly helped. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Use gratitude to drive you forward, but don’t treat it as your sole motivator for helping others – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • When you’re generous and effective at growing other people, people will follow you. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Caring leaders are more able to get their employees to take action than leaders who don’t care. – @SandersSays [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]

There are, of course, many more fascinating and thought-provoking insights shared during this episode – it’s just that some can’t fit into 140 characters or they’re just so much more enjoyable to learn hearing them from Tim himself. This episode also features a number of fun and insightful stories, including a reading trick my middle daughter Malaika – whose not much of a book-reader – uses to capture and recall information she reads in books assigned for school.

As I mentioned at the end of this episode, I’d love to hear what you think about this episode, as well as what other topics you’d be interested in hearing more about in upcoming episodes of my show. Please share your thoughts and ideas by leaving a comment below or by filling out the contact form on my website.

I’d also appreciate it if you could rate my show on Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or iTunes to help support future episodes of this leadership podcast.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast:

[Running time: 54 minutes]

Noteworthy links:

  • Buy Tim Sanders’ book “Love Is The Killer App” on Amazon.com (or Amazon.ca for Canadian readers).
  • Check out the special Leadership Biz Cafe webpage on Tim’s website featuring exclusive content for my listeners at TimSanders.com/LBC.
  • Learn more about Tim’s work and his writings at TimSanders.com.

Customer Loyalty – Marrying Ease With Humanity

Driving-customer-loyalty

The following is a guest piece by New York Times best-selling author Joseph Michelli.

Look no farther than your smart phone and you will see what your customers really want today!

They seek, and have come to expect, companies will make their lives easier and provide technological solutions that enable them to do business with you “on their terms” and in the context of their busy lives.

As such, we are all in the business of delivering “ease!” Back in high school, the last word most of us wanted attached to our personal brand was that we were “easy”; however, in business today that is a badge of honor!

If, heaven forbid, your company is difficult to do business with or if you require your customers to exert substantial effort, those customers have a world wide web of other options and the ability to expeditiously write scathing online reviews.

In 2012, the Harvard Business Review foreshadowed the emerging consumer hunger for “easy interactions” by publishing an article titled “Stop Trying to Delight Your Customers”. In it, researchers showed that the more Click here to continue reading »”Customer Loyalty – Marrying Ease With Humanity”

My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2015

My-Top-10-Leadership-Insights-for-2015

In my penultimate article from 2015, I made the point that in answering the question “where do we go from here?”, we have to look back on the journey we’ve taken and what lessons and insights we’ve learned that can help us as we move forward.

So for my first piece for 2016, I thought it would be a wonderful way to illustrate this idea by doing just that – of looking back at the past 52 weeks of leadership articles and leadership podcast episodes shared here on my award-winning leadership blog in order to discover what were my Top 10 leadership insights that garnered the most interest among my readers.

As I wrote in that earlier piece, our future success hinges on how well we connect where we need to go with what we’ve learned so far [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter]. To that end, as we make plans for what we’d like to achieve in 2016, here’s a look at my Top 10 Leadership Insights from 2015, insights that can help you to use your leadership to not only drive success in your organization in 2016, but create that kind of environment that will allow your employees to thrive under your care.

 

Leadership Insight #10 – Our words do not simply impart information; they influence how people see the value of what they do [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter].

“This is exactly what we see lying at the heart of every study looking into what’s behind those persistent low levels of employee engagement in organizations around the world – a lack of genuine communication between leaders and those under their care.

Time and again, there are study findings released that demonstrate that people want to know that their efforts matter, if not also why they should care about our vision. They want to understand the connections between their efforts and the larger shared purpose that defines why we do what we do.

And this is understandable if we appreciate that – thanks to the faster-pace by which we now have to operate – it’s become harder for people to make those connections for themselves.”

Read more on this leadership insight here: Understanding The Power Of Our Words

 

Leadership Insight #9 – People don’t get excited about being efficient; they get excited about doing work that matters [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter].

“This is the real differentiator between those organizations that are Click here to continue reading »”My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2015″

Why Compassion Is Key To Succeeding At Leadership

Importance-of-compassion-in-leadership

With the arrival of September, many of us are returning to our regular routines now that our children are back in school and the period for taking summer vacation breaks has come to an end. For myself, this September also marks a special milestone in my writing career – specifically, it marks the one-year anniversary of the launch of my first leadership book, “Leadership Vertigo”.

Since the release of my first book last fall, I’ve been on an incredible journey speaking to organizations and audiences in Europe, the Middle East, Canada, and the US, sharing my insights on leadership and how leaders can encourage and support their employees to bring their full selves to the work they do.

This journey of sharing my writings and insights on leadership over these past five years has lead to the achievement of another very special milestone this month – that of being invited to speak this Wednesday at the Management Grand Rounds at Boston’s Children’s Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

This prestigious leadership speakers series has welcomed in the past such leadership luminaries as Tony Hsieh, Doug Conant, Robert Sutton, Amy Edmondson, and Daniel Pink. Being invited to join the ranks alongside these renowned thought leaders as one of the speakers of this series is definitely one of the highest honours of my career to date.

The timing of these two milestone events has brought to mind some of the leadership insights I’ve shared in my book and there’s one in particular that I wanted to share with my readers as I prepare for this upcoming talk. Specifically, why it’s becoming increasingly important for leaders to cultivate compassion in their leadership so that they can succeed in bringing out the best in those they lead.

In fact, one of the recurring themes I’ve been asked to speak about this year is how do leaders embrace the elements of emotional intelligence that we hear so often about in articles and studies on successful leadership. There’s a genuine interest and desire out there to know how leaders can create an environment where people are willing to dedicate their native talents, creativity, and insights to their organization’s vision and shared purpose.

As I’ve discussed in some of the talks I’ve given this year, what’s needed here is Click here to continue reading »”Why Compassion Is Key To Succeeding At Leadership”

Speak To The Heart To Lead Change

Leading-with-heart

The following is a guest piece by Dianna Booher.

“I’ve sold millions and millions of dollars during my 30 years at IBM, and it never occurred to me that people make their buying decisions based on emotion first, and then justified with logic,” John said to me over dinner a few weeks ago. “But you’re right. As I think back about the various client deals, I can see that. I definitely can see that.

Another case in point.

But more formal, rigorous research shows overwhelmingly that people base buying decisions on emotion, and then support them with logic. In a business setting, a logical argument is expected, of course. Just don’t count on the logical argument to win people over to your way of thinking.

In “The Heart of Change”, John Kotter and Dan Cohen discuss a study they conducted with Deloitte Consulting about the nature of change. The study involved more than 400 interviewees from 130 companies in the United States, Australia, Europe, and South Africa.

Their interpretation of the data? Even in large corporations that focus on very logical approaches to strategy, culture, and analysis of data, change happens because the leaders find a way to help people see problems or solutions in ways that influence their emotions, not just their reasoning.

In my own research for “What More Can I Say: Why Communication Fails and What to Do About It”, executives told me the same things over and over: To lead change, influence others, and gain commitment, speak to the heart.

So what does that mean exactly? Click here to continue reading »”Speak To The Heart To Lead Change”

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