Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

My TEDx Talk – A Personal Journey To Find Meaning In Success

Is passion all we really need to be happy and successful? In this engaging and humorous talk, Tanveer Naseer shares two personal stories that reveal how purpose leads us to the life we were meant to live.

In writing this leadership blog, I’ve had the opportunity to share several personal stories that help to illustrate some key insights into how we can succeed in our role as leaders. So it seems only appropriate to share here what will undoubtedly be one of the highlights of my career – my TEDx talk that I gave on the topic of finding purpose in what we do.

In my TEDx talk, I share two personal stories from my work career that have helped to shape my understanding of not only what it takes to be a successful leader, but what it takes to achieve enduring success, and the motivation to always bring our best to the work we do.

In many ways, this talk reveals what’s driven me to succeed in the leadership sphere, including being recognized last week in Inc. as one of the Top Leadership Speakers of 2018, a list that includes leadership luminaries Douglas Conant, Marshall Goldsmith, Liz Wiseman, and Daniel Pink, to name but a few.

Some of the personal lessons I share in my TEDx talk include:

  • Our sense of purpose is not simply derived by what we do, but by how we choose to view what we do [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].
  • We all long to feel like we’re a part of something bigger than ourselves; that we understand the impact of our contributions [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].
  • If we’re not fulfilling our purpose, how can our successes truly matter? Why will we care about these achievements once the glow has faded? [Twitter logoShare on Twitter]
  • Our real strengths push us to challenge ourselves to do and be better than we are today [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].
  • Our passion is a reflection of the sense of purpose we gain from the work we do, and the lives we choose to live [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

 

 

The overall mission of TED is to offer “ideas worth spreading”. To that end, I’d like to end my piece with a request. I’d like to ask that you not only watch my TEDx talk, but that you share it with others, either by sharing this blog post or by sharing this link to my TEDx talk on YouTube.

I want to encourage you to share my TEDx talk not just with your work colleagues, but with your family and friends because I truly believe this is an idea that’s not only worth spreading, but can provide immense value to others to understand how they can achieve meaningful and enduring success.

My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2017

A look back at my Top 10 leadership insights from 2017 and what they reveal about how leaders can be successful in the year ahead.

With the New Year now well under way, many of us are understandably creating goals and developing plans for what we’d like to achieve over the course of the next 12 months. For myself, the start of a New Year also presents a unique opportunity to look back on the past 52 weeks to see which of my writings resonated the most with my readers.

It’s an interesting exercise because it not only lets me know what ideas and topics garner the most interest and engagement from my audience, but it also reveals some interesting patterns about what’s on the forefront on the minds of today’s leaders.

Perhaps most interestingly is the fact that – as was the case for the my top leadership insight in 2016 – the top leadership insight I shared last year came from a piece that revolved around a personal story of mine and the lessons I learned of how to be more effective in how to lead and serve those under our care.

In fact, the second most popular leadership insight also came from a personal experience, in this case from one of my daughters who took on her first leadership role last year and what that experience taught her about what it really takes to successfully lead others.

So, I’m definitely going to keep that in mind when it comes to what I plan on writing and sharing here on my leadership blog over the course of the next 12 months to come.

In the meantime, here are my Top 10 leadership insights of 2017 as chosen by you, the readers of my award-winning leadership blog. Enjoy!

Leadership Insight #10 – Becoming a leader is not about promoting yourself; it’s about helping others to succeed and thrive [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

“Bringing this kind of intentionality to how we develop and support leaders is important, not only to how organizations select who will join the leadership ranks within their workplace, but in how our employees view and understand what they should expect from those in charge.

Indeed, as much as it’s critical for today’s leaders to create an environment where employees are internally driven to bring their best efforts to the work they do, it’s incumbent on those in senior leadership positions to ensure that they are providing the right guidance and support for those who will one day take their place at the helm.”

Read more on this leadership insight here: Are You Supporting Your Organization’s New Leaders To Succeed?

Leadership Insight #9 – The power to inspire others exists in all of us. We just have to choose to be present to use it [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

“To illustrate what I mean by this, think about any leader who you look to as a source of inspiration. No doubt they’ve Click here to continue reading »”My Top 10 Leadership Insights For 2017″

How Organizations Can Help New Leaders To Succeed

Learn about how organizations can support and guide new leaders to ensure they are successful in their new roles in the organization.

Without question, one of the common tasks organizations everywhere have to deal with is leadership development. Whether it’s due to an aging workforce or the growing numbers of Millennials now moving their way through the workplace, there’s no question that developing the next group of leaders will play a key role in an organization’s growth and success in the coming years.

But what measures should organizations be taking to not only create effective leadership development programs, but to support these new leaders to ensure a successful transition into these new roles in the organization? That’s the focus of my conversation with Dr. Naphtali Hoff in this episode of my leadership podcast, Leadership Biz Cafe.

Naphtali Hoff is an human and organizational psychologist and also President of Impactful Coaching & Consulting, where he works as an organizational consultant.

He is also the author of the book “Becoming The New Boss – The New Leader’s Guide To Sustained Leadership Success”, which is the focus of this episode.

Over the course of our conversation, Naphtali and I discuss a number of key factors around leadership development and succeeding at leadership, including:

  • The key areas organizations should address to help prepare new leaders for what awaits them.
  • How organizations can create mentoring opportunities that benefit both new and experienced leaders.
  • How to help new leaders learn to effectively delegate responsibilities to their team members.
  • How both new and experienced leaders can “think positive and achieve” to drive their organization’s vision forward.
    Why organizations need to move beyond learning and create “a workplace of teachers” and how to go about doing this.

I’d appreciate it if you could help your support help support future episodes of this leadership podcast by taking a moment to rate my show on Google Play, Stitcher Radio, or iTunes.

It’s worth noting that my leadership podcast was recognized by Inc. As one of “12 podcasts that will make you a better leader”. So please help me get the word out about my show.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast: Click here to continue reading »”How Organizations Can Help New Leaders To Succeed”

Are You Helping Employees Find Purpose In What They Do?

A revealing look at the role leaders need to play to help their employees find purpose in the work they do and with it, fuel their organization's growth.

As the clock starts to wind down on 2017, I’ve been spending some time reflecting on some of the recurring themes and ideas I’ve written and spoken about over the past 12 months. Among these various leadership topics and issues was the subject of finding a sense of purpose in what we do, a topic which also served as the focus of the TEDx talk I gave this past September here in Montreal.

With this in mind, I’d like to share the story of a student who attends my daughters’ high school and what his example reveals about the role leaders play in helping their employees find a sense of purpose in what they do.

At our school’s Governing Board meeting last week, we had two teachers who shared a new project they run for students who are at-risk of dropping out of high school. In this program, these students spend half their school day learning core curriculum subjects and the other half is spent learning vocational skills on-site. This way, when they graduate, they already have hands-on experience to help them enter the workforce.

One of the latest projects involves rebuilding and restoring bikes confiscated by the police. As we toured the bike workshop, I couldn’t help but notice how clean this machinery shop was, especially given the kind of work that gets done there.

I was told by one of the teachers running the program that at the beginning of the school year, one of these at-risk students told him “I don’t want to work on fixing bikes. I just want to work on keeping this place clean. I want to broom the floors, wipe clean the work surfaces, and take care of the garbage.” So, this teacher decided to give this student a pass on teaching him how to repair bikes and instead, guided him on how he could keep the place tidy and putting things back where they belong.

As I looked around the workshop, I couldn’t help but be impressed that the reason why this workshop was so clean was because one of the students had stepped forward saying the skills he’d like to learn were how to keep a machinery workshop clean and organized.

Since our board meeting, I’ve been thinking a lot about this boy; of how at such a young age, he had figured out an important truth about the nature of purpose – our sense of purpose is not simply created by the work we do, but through the choices we make [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

In terms of leadership, what this means is that we don’t have to be Click here to continue reading »”Are You Helping Employees Find Purpose In What They Do?”

How Should Leaders Address Challenge Of Low Performers?

Dealing with low performers can often be a difficult process. But avoiding dealing with low performing employees can often be more damaging to employee morale and your bottom line.

The following is a guest piece by Terri Williams.

A chain is only as strong as its weakest link, and a company is only as strong as its lowest-performing employees. At first, this analogy may appear to be an overreach—after all, how can one or even a handful of poorly performing workers affect the success of an entire organization?

However, according to data from the Eagle Hill National Attrition Survey, low performers can have significantly negative effects on an organization. Below are a few excerpts from the survey respondents:

  • 68% say low performers lower overall workplace morale.
  • 44% say low performers increase the work burden on high performers.
  • 54% say low performers contribute to a lack of initiative and motivation, resulting in a work culture where mediocrity is accepted.

Low performers in management roles contribute to attrition among high performers. These workers leave for a variety of reasons, including limited career growth and pay. However, according to Eagle Hill’s survey, among companies with high turnover rates, 26% of high performers leave because of poor management.

And it’s costing companies a pretty penny to replace workers. Eagle Hill reports that replacing a mid-level employee – including hiring and training costs, in addition to lost revenue and lost productivity – can add up to 150% of that employee’s salary.

How Low Performers Affect Morale and the Company’s Bottom Line

Low performers undermine the concept of teamwork. According to Autumn Manning, CEO of YouEarnedIt, an employee engagement firm. “So much work today is accomplished through a team, and the really tough problems are the ones that require a creative approach, critical thinking, or a team who has the desire and motivation to work harder and smarter.”

However, if one or more members of the team are viewed as free loaders, it can negatively Click here to continue reading »”How Should Leaders Address Challenge Of Low Performers?”

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