Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

4 Keys For Bringing Out The Best From Introverts

Learn about 4 steps organizations can take to tap into the full potential of introverted employees found in their workforce.

The following is a guest piece by Kate Rodriguez.

One of the hottest themes in management and leadership today is the importance of understanding the introvert at work.

The idea that workplaces reward extroverts has been around for a while. Discussions on the differences between those with outward-looking personalities (extroverts) versus those with inward tendencies (introverts) has been around for years – the concept was introduced by psychiatrist Carl Jung in 1921 – but it has reached fever pitch since the 2012 release of the book “Quiet” by Susan Cain, which asserts that introverts are dramatically undervalued and organisations suffer as a result.

Research points out that while nearly half the population is introverted, extroverts hold the majority of leadership roles. “The research I’ve done shows that about 25 to 30 percent of CEOs are introverts,” explains Karl Moore, associate professor of strategy and organization at Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University. This indicates there are also a significant number of introverts leading extroverts and not just the other way around, as the research tends to suppose.

Professional roles of introverts vs. extroverts

Introverts and extroverts tend to migrate to career fields that play to their dispositions, says Moore. People-facing jobs, like sales, management consulting and investment banking are dominated by extroverts. Introverts alternatively often move into Click here to continue reading »”4 Keys For Bringing Out The Best From Introverts”

How To Better Support Introverts In Today’s Workplaces

How leaders can help support introverted employees in today's workplaces featuring insights from McGill management professor Karl Moore.

The following is a guest contribution from Kate Rodriguez on behalf of The Economist Executive Education Navigator.

One of the hottest themes in management and leadership today is the importance of understanding the introvert at work.

The idea that workplaces reward extroverts has been around for a while. Discussions on the differences between those with outward-looking personalities (extroverts) versus those with inward tendencies (introverts) has been around for years – the concept was introduced by psychiatrist Carl Jung in 1921 – but it has reached fever pitch since the 2012 release of the book “Quiet” by Susan Cain, which asserts that introverts are dramatically undervalued and organisations suffer as a result.

Research points out that while nearly half the population is introverted, extroverts hold the majority of leadership roles. “The research I’ve done shows that about 25 to 30 percent of CEOs are introverts,” explains Karl Moore, associate professor of strategy and organization at Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University. This indicates there are also a Click here to continue reading »”How To Better Support Introverts In Today’s Workplaces”