Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

Understanding The Real Drivers Of Employee Engagement

NYT bestselling author Kevin Kruse reveals the 4 real drivers of employee engagement that are critical to an organization's ability to drive growth and success.

It’s a common fact of leadership today that if you want to improve productivity and fuel organizational growth, you need to make sure your employees are engaged at work.

And yet, despite both the evidence supporting the critical role employee engagement plays to driving your organization’s success and most leaders wanting to improve employee engagement levels in their workplace, organizations everywhere are still struggling with this issue. Why is that? This conundrum serves as the basis of my conversation with fellow leadership expert and NYT bestselling author, Kevin Kruse.

Kevin is a serial entrepreneur having founded several multi-million dollar companies, and even winning the “Inc 500” and “Best Places To Work” award for company culture.

In addition to writing for Forbes, Kevin is the author of several books, including his New York Times bestseller, “We: How to Increase Performance and Profits Through Full Engagement”. Currently, Kevin serves as the Founder and CEO of LEADx, an online leadership learning platform that offers free leadership development to leaders around the world.

In this episode, Kevin and I focus on his book “Employee Engagement For Everyone: 4 Keys to Happiness and Fulfillment at Work” and over the course of our conversation, we touch on a number of important insights about employee engagement, including:

  • Why the biggest hurdle we face in improving employee engagement is often due to our not truly understanding what it really means.
  • The surprising finding about who’s responsible for driving employee engagement in today’s workplaces.
    How improving employee engagement levels doesn’t simply benefit the organization, but also has a positive impact on employees outside of work.
  • What studies have found to be the 4 primary drivers to effectively drive employee engagement, and with it, organizational growth and success.
  • Understanding what building trust really means in terms of driving employee engagement.
  • What leaders get wrong about communicating more to boost employee engagement.
  • What leaders and employees need to understand about recognition and its role in driving employee engagement.

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It’s worth noting that my leadership podcast was recognized by Inc. As one of “12 podcasts that will make you a better leader”. So please help me get the word out about my show.

Click on the player below to listen to the podcast: Click here to continue reading »”Understanding The Real Drivers Of Employee Engagement”

What We Get Wrong About Authenticity In Leadership

Discover why authenticity in leadership is not about being the “real you”, but about understanding what your purpose and core values are.

When it comes to improving the way we lead, there’s a number of approaches that have been championed by both leadership experts and researchers looking into understanding what makes someone a successful leader.

While some concepts can be straightforward, others are more susceptible to misinterpretation and consequently, lead to approaches that weaken your ability to bring out the best in those you lead. One example of this is the idea that we need to be “more authentic” in our leadership.

Unfortunately, talk of authenticity in leadership often gives rise to the notion that leaders simply need to be ‘the real you’.

The truth, though, is that when it comes to leadership, authenticity isn’t about being the “real me”, but being true to our purpose and values that drive us [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

It means that in every encounter, in every conversation, and in every word we speak and action we take we hold ourselves true to that vision that defines why we do what we do, as well as to those core values that serve as both our cardinal points and rudder to ensure we stay the course and not run astray.

Of course, when it comes to core values in leadership, not surprisingly the values that come up are integrity, trust, and respect. Without question, these are important values that a leader must treat as not only unshakable, but ones that should never be compromised in order to achieve our goals or vision.

However, in the context of authenticity in leadership, we need to do more than simply adhere to these core values considering how these are values that we should expect in everyone and not just in those holding leadership positions.

After all, would you willingly buy from someone who lacks integrity in how they’re willing to short-change you to increase their profit margins? Would you want to do business with someone who disrespects you or the people you care about? And would you be okay doing business with someone you don’t trust?

Of course not, which is why we need to recognize that these aren’t noble or virtuous values to hold, but the very least we should have and be doing.

But this is where our values allow us to be more authentic in our leadership as they help to Click here to continue reading »”What We Get Wrong About Authenticity In Leadership”

Do You Have The Courage To Change How You Lead?

Leading change is more than a process; it's a journey that challenges our understandings and opens up new insights and perspectives.

If there’s one constant to doing business in today’s global environment, it’s that things inevitably change.

Of course, when it comes to change in today’s organizations, more often than not it’s sorted into one of two boxes – change that drives our efforts towards innovation, or change that we have to manage in response to fluid conditions in our market space.

In my work, I get many leaders who want to discuss the latter condition – of how to manage change that comes with the changing needs of your customers, the changing needs of what you need to attract and retain employees, and the changing needs of how you’re supposed to lead in an increasingly multi-generational and diverse workforce.

In many of these conversations, it becomes clear that what these leaders are after is a playbook – a straightforward, step-by-step process of how to get through this “change initiative” quickly, so that they can shift their focus back to the work that they view as being ‘the real and important work’.

But change is not simply another item on your To-Do list. Indeed, dealing with change is more than a process; it’s an on-going journey of exploration and discovery [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

This is that roadblock that impedes so many of us from taking those critical first steps in this journey of change. As there’s no guaranteed notion of what awaits us, how can we be sure it’s worth opening the door to see what’s on the other side?

As such, the question we face is do we have the courage to change, not just today, but as we move forward? [Twitter logoShare on Twitter] Will we treat change not merely as something we’re willing to do today, but as something we’ll embrace going forward as new realities sharpen into focus as we continue on our journey towards achieving our long-term goals?

Of course, sometimes we might not feel as though we have a choice, especially in those moments when Click here to continue reading »”Do You Have The Courage To Change How You Lead?”

6 Steps To Strengthen Team Cohesion

Learn about 6 steps leaders can take to strengthen team cohesion to boost employee productivity and drive organizational growth.

If there’s one point all of us can agree on today, it’s that we’re living in increasingly divisive times.

As a writer, I can certainly appreciate the irony of this statement. But as a leadership expert, it also highlights a critical function leaders need to play both to drive organizational growth, as well as to boost employee productivity.

While those efforts to divide us as opposed to discovering those commonalities that bind us together might seem to be more an issue within the political and social issues realm, organizations are clearly feeling the effects of these forces within their workforce.

And this is something leaders need to be mindful of if they are to continue to foster conditions necessary for ensuring people can work together effectively towards the achievement of a common goal.

As such, here are six steps that will help you strengthen team cohesion, regardless of what storms might be looming outside your organization’s walls.

1. Draw clear lines between what your team does and the shared purpose of your organization
One of the best ways to strengthen team cohesion is helping your employees to view their efforts within the context of the larger vision of the organization. After all, it’s easy to care about our contributions, but what about the contributions their fellow team mates make? Of course, when people don’t carry their load or if they make a mistake that impacts the whole team, it’s easy to care (or more likely get upset).

But team cohesion is about getting everyone on the team to consider the whole along with the individual parts. In other words, when you communicate and lead your team using your shared purpose as your compass, everyone wins [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

2. Ensure employees get real-time feedback to help assess their performance
There’s a common consensus amongst the various studies on employee engagement that leaders need to be giving more feedback to their employees. But another thing leaders should be doing to strengthen team cohesion is promoting conditions that encourage employees to give each other feedback in real-time, and not just as part of some 360 annual review.

Getting real-time feedback from your peers fosters greater clarity about how various team members are perceived to improve contributions and involvement. Ensuring your team members get feedback from their colleagues will also reduce Click here to continue reading »”6 Steps To Strengthen Team Cohesion”

4 Steps To Move Past Setbacks And Drive Success

Learn about 4 steps that can help leaders successfully navigate through setbacks and get their organization back on track towards achieving its long-term goals.

In today’s faster-paced, interconnected global environment, there’s no question that there are greater demands on leaders in terms of what they need to deliver. And those demands become more apparent when an organization suffers a setback in achieving its long-term goals.

It’s part of the human condition that when we experience setbacks in our hopes, plans, or even dreams, we retreat to our comfort zones to try and address this new wellspring of doubt and uncertainty regarding where we go from here.

While as individuals we have the opportunity to fall back within ourselves as we grapple with what to do next, as a leader, these are the times when your employees need to hear from you the most, not only to help them better understand what went wrong, but more importantly, what happens now.

Given how setbacks tend to create challenging times for an organization – and by extension your leadership – here are four steps that provide a roadmap for how you can help your employees navigate these periods of uncertainty and get back to achieving your long term goals.

1. Be up front about what’s going on
When we encounter setbacks, the natural inclination is to close ranks as an instinctual, protective response when faced with uncertainties about what’s to come. In leadership circles, there’s also a need to protect our sense of authority; that despite the fact that things haven’t turned out the way we planned, we do know what we’re doing.

Unfortunately, these self-protecting measures often lead to treating information as something that’s on a need to know basis. And as most of us have experienced, when there’s an information vacuum inside an organization, people will simply fill that void with their own assumptions or worst, their fears.

So, the first thing we need to do is be up front and honest about the situation. Admit to really what’s going on.

Indeed, by being open when you’re faced with setbacks, leaders instill greater trust in their leadership [Twitter logoShare on Twitter].

2. Relate to how this setback affects your employees and not just yourself
Recently, I worked with one leader whose company was grappling with the loss of a major contract. This setback not only created a lot of anxiety and stress within the company’s ranks, it also meant most employees had to tighten their belts as anticipated salary bumps were cut back due to the loss of revenue.

In the hopes of boosting employee morale, this leader shared with his employees how this setback was affecting him personally as well, given how his wife and him had to delay their plans of buying a new house.

This leader told me he hoped sharing his personal hardships with his employees would foster the feeling that they were all in this together. Unfortunately, the only thing his message gave rise to was feelings of animosity and resentment among his employees

What he failed to understand is that what his employees needed was Click here to continue reading »”4 Steps To Move Past Setbacks And Drive Success”

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