Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

9 Strategies Of Uncommon Wisdom For Fuelling Top Performance

Learn about 9 strategies leaders can employ that are key to achieving top performance in the organization.

The following is a guest piece by Larry Sternberg.

Fuelling top performance is the goal for most leaders and managers. The best managers know their people are the key to achieving top performance on every metric of success they track. As a leader or manager, how can you make the biggest difference through leveraging the talents and efforts of the people on your team? This handful of specific strategies can help.

1. Accept People As They Are
Your job as a manager is not to change people. Your job is to optimize people’s performance. Start by accepting people as they are. The old adage applies here: Marry as is, and consider any change a bonus.

Select people for your team who have the right mix of strengths, knowledge and potential. Focus on what’s right with people instead of what’s wrong with them. Optimize the alignment between what people bring to the table and what you need your team to achieve. And, be prepared to tolerate some undesirable behaviors — because they are part of the package.

2. Emphasize the Why
Consider the story of three people laying bricks. When asked, “What are you doing?” One person replies, “I’m laying bricks.” The second person says, “I’m part of a team building a really big brick wall.” The third person replies, “I’m just one of many people working together here to build a cathedral where people will get married, christen their babies and lay their loved ones to rest.” Which of these people do you think is most motivated to do great work?

Help people advance from what to why so they see their work as Click here to continue reading »”9 Strategies Of Uncommon Wisdom For Fuelling Top Performance”

Timing Leadership For Today’s Faster-Paced World

A look at the two different ways we experience time and how leaders can manage these perceptions to improve their organization's performance.

The following is a guest piece by Sally Blount, Dean of the Kellogg School of Management, and Sophie Leroy, assistant professor at University of Washington’s Bothell’s School.

CEO tenure in the Fortune 500 has fallen from an average of 11 years in 2002 to six years today. The average life span of a company in the Fortune 500 has shrunk from 25 years in 1980 to just 15 today. The end result is a pervasive sense of anxiety and time famine, as both companies and the executives within them struggle to keep up.

But speed and urgency, although necessary attributes of leadership, are not sufficient. In fact, our research suggests that the leaders who can tether an obsession with deadlines and time to an ability to sense the work and energy flow of their colleagues will have the most success.

Cultural anthropologists were the first to recognize that people tend to track time in two ways: clock time and social time. Under clock time, punctuality and predictability are highly valued. People adhere strictly to deadlines and appointment times.

Under social time, by contrast, conversational and relational smoothness and the ability to complete a thought or interaction without abruptness are valued. A fluid sense of natural rhythm in conversations and interactions over time enhances relationship building.

Research found that, traditionally, southern European and Latin cultures placed more emphasis on social time and Anglo-Saxon cultures placed more emphasis on clock time. But these cultural differences are beginning to wane as more of the world moves to a global business culture driven by clock time. Still, within the same culture, research has long found significant differences in how people experience time. Click here to continue reading »”Timing Leadership For Today’s Faster-Paced World”

4 Secrets To Making Time For Leadership

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The following is a guest piece by New York Times bestselling author, Kevin Kruse.

Do you ever feel like you know what you should be doing as a leader, but there just isn’t enough time to actually do it?

How do successful people create pockets of time so they can become a leader of people, not just managers of tasks?

I recently had the chance to interview over 200 highly successful people including billionaires, millionaires and many CEOs who were leading small and large teams alike. One of the consistent things I found was that effective leaders are very mindful of time. Most have conscious or unconscious habits and rituals that they use to remain highly productive, without feeling overwhelmed. As Fizzle CEO, Corbett Barr, told me:

I stay productive by developing and maintaining what I call a personal “operating system”, which is a set of processes, tools and checkpoints that define how I get work done every day. The specifics of an operating system differ from person to person, but the important thing is that you have one.

As Barr mentioned above, there is no one-size-fits-all for time management, but after reviewing the practices of hundreds of individuals, I’ve developed a simplified productivity system I call, E-3C. The E stands for Energy, and the three C’s are Capture, Calendar, and Concentrate. Click here to continue reading »”4 Secrets To Making Time For Leadership”

Think Inside The Box To Solve Leadership Challenges

Leadership-thinking-inside-the-box

The following is a guest piece by Mike Figliuolo.

The phrase “think outside the box” makes me physically ill. It’s trite and isn’t at all practical. But inside the box? That’s where great leaders go to get more out of their teams. You can too with a simple assessment tool that provides insights as to how to most effectively lead the unique members of your team.

Preface: I’m an idiot. My friend and fellow thoughtLEADERS instructor Victor Prince hoodwinked me into co-authoring a new book: “Lead Inside the Box – How Smart Leaders Guide Their Teams to Exceptional Results“. The premise is you need to evaluate the amount of output you get from a team member and compare that to the amount of time and energy you have to invest in them to get it. We call that second piece “leadership capital.”

The result of those comparisons is the Leadership Matrix (or “the box” for short). Within that matrix, we define behavioral archetypes from Slackers to Rising Stars and everything in between. The real insight lies in practical advice on how to lead those folks to improve their performance.

By understanding the behaviors your team members will demonstrate and how you invest (or don’t invest) your time and effort into them, you’ll get a clearer picture of the 8 archetypical behaviors that can show up in the box. With that understanding, you can begin leading differently which will improve your performance. Those archetypes are as follows: Click here to continue reading »”Think Inside The Box To Solve Leadership Challenges”

The 3 Questions Leaders Must Ask And Answer

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The following is a guest piece by Scott Eblin.

During the past six of the fourteen years I’ve been an executive coach and leadership educator, my observation is that my clients are generally more stressed each year than they were the year before. The feeling of being overworked and overwhelmed has gone up year over year. One of the ways I know this is by asking a few questions at the beginning of most of my presentations.

Let’s say we have a roomful of 100 corporate executives and managers. The first question I ask is “How many of you have been promoted in the past year?” Usually around 20 or 30 percent of the audience members raise a hand. The next question is “How many of you are in the same job you were in a year ago but the scope is much bigger today?” That question brings a lot more raised hands – usually at least 80 percent of the audience.

Then I ask, “How many of you are in the same job you were in a year ago, but the performance bar has risen significantly in the past 12 months?” That’s usually about 100 percent of the hands. Finally, I ask, “How many of you are operating in a constantly changing competitive environment?” That is most definitely 100 percent of the hands.

If you’re doing the math at home, you recognize that most people are raising their hands at least twice, maybe three times or even four. So, it’s sort of obvious why they feel overworked and overwhelmed.

Beginning with the Financial Crisis of 2008, most organizations have adopted a Click here to continue reading »”The 3 Questions Leaders Must Ask And Answer”

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