Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

7 Strategies To Lead With Abundance

Learn about 7 strategies leaders can employ in order to shift from leading with a scarcity mindset to an abundance mindset in order to empower employees.

The following is a guest piece by Dr. Naphtali Hoff.

“People with a scarcity mentality tend to see everything in terms of win-lose. There is only so much; and if someone else has it, that means there will be less for me. The more principle-centered we become, the more we develop an abundance mentality, the more we are genuinely happy for the successes, well-being, achievements, recognition, and good fortune of other people. We believe their success adds to…rather than detracts from…our lives.” ~ Stephen R. Covey

About four years ago, I made the decision to shift careers from school leadership to that of executive coach and consultant. To that end, I enrolled in a doctoral program studying human and organizational psychology. In my first course, I was told to interview someone who was in the same field that I sought to pursue and ask that person a series of questions relating to their career path.

After doing some research, I found two successful women that fit the bill. While both were pleasant to speak with and generous with their time, one in particular, a coach and trainer, shared some things that really made an impression on me.

She said that she had benefitted from others’ expertise when she had gotten started and was always looking for ways to “pay it forward” to other aspiring professionals. The fact that I was planning to move to her general area and serve similar clients did not deter her from giving freely of her advice.

She even met me on another occasion over lunch to talk further about how to help me transition and grow my business.

This woman’s behavior not only helped me to get started but she also inspired me to rethink a lifelong script that had become part of my inner thinking and attitude. I refer specifically to Scarcity Theory.

Scarcity Theory, a term coined by Stephen Covey, suggests that Click here to continue reading »”7 Strategies To Lead With Abundance”

Understanding What Drives Us To Push Ahead

How do we motivate our employees – and ourselves – when the focus is simply on getting today's work done?

As the month of June begins to wind down, I’ve found myself reflecting on a unique milestone for my blog – namely, how this month marks my 8th year of writing my blog, marking almost a decade of sharing my writings and insights with my online readership.

I have to be honest in admitting that I never imagined that I’d be writing a blog for so long, where I put out new ideas and insights every week. Extrapolate that out over eight years and that means over 400 articles on communication, vision, teamwork, shared purpose, employee engagement, strategy, and so many other topics found under the umbrella of leadership.

Then again, creating new articles to share your ideas and insights on leadership doesn’t come with a fixed end point – a date and time that you can circle on a calendar or enter into an app as being the finish line.

Indeed, as is the case with leadership, you can’t know ahead when you’ll be done until you reach that moment where you can survey the landscape around you and know that you’ve done what you were meant to do, and that it’s now time to hand over the helm to someone else.

Of course, there are times well before you cross that finish line where you might feel the desire – or perhaps more accurately, the fatigue – that comes with delivering on the expectations others have of you; a feeling that makes you want to call it a day and let someone else mind the store.

It’s certainly a thought that comes to mind at times when I’m sitting at my computer trying to figure out what to write next – of what lessons I can share from the work I do, from the conversations I have with various leaders, or even from things I observe going on around me.

In those moments of creative stillness, I find myself facing one critical question to determine which fork in the road I should take; between moving on or moving ahead – does what I do still matter?

Now, I could use various metrics for my blog to help evaluate that question. This is, after all, the age of Big Data, where so many of those critical insights that we need to determine our progress, of where we need to focus our limited time and resources to obtain the end outcomes we desire can be extracted from reams of data tracking almost every aspect of modern work and life.

And yet, what this fails to take into consideration is that leadership is not found in a spreadsheet, but in the relationships we have with those we lead [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter].

One thing that I’ve come to rely on to remind me of this notion is Click here to continue reading »”Understanding What Drives Us To Push Ahead”

10 Principles For Developing Strategic Leaders

Learn about 10 principles that every organization should employ in order to develop strategic leaders who can drive organizational growth and success.

The following is a guest piece by Jessica Leitch, David Lancefield, and Mark Dawson.

Most companies have leaders with the strong operational skills needed to maintain the status quo. But they are facing a critical deficit: They lack people with the know-how, experience, and confidence required to tackle “wicked problems.” Such problems can’t be solved by a single command, they have causes that seem incomprehensible and solutions that seem uncertain, and they often require companies to transform the way they do business.

A 2015 PwC study of 6,000 senior executives, conducted using a research methodology developed by David Rooke of Harthill Consulting and William Torbert of Boston University, revealed just how pervasive this shortfall is: Only 8 percent of the respondents turned out to be strategic leaders, or those effective at leading transformations.

Fortunately, companies can build the capacity for strategic leadership. The following 10 principles can help unlock potential strategic leaders in your enterprise. These principles represent a combination of organizational systems and individual capabilities — the hardware and software of transformation.

You may have already adopted some of these tenets, and think that’s enough. But only when you implement all of them together, as a single system, will they enable you to attract, develop, and retain the strategic leaders who’ve eluded you thus far. Click here to continue reading »”10 Principles For Developing Strategic Leaders”

Where Do We Go From Here?

Looking-back-before-looking-ahead

As 2015 begins to wind down, many of us – myself included – are understandably eager to wrap up the remaining work threads of this year so we can shift our focus to what we’d like to achieve and move forward with in the New Year.

Indeed, researchers at Wharton University have found that moments that stir notions of a fresh start or a new beginning are aligned with that internal motivation we all have to strive to do better, to be better than we are today.

And yet, as most of us know firsthand, those promises that a new year often brings to mind invariably loses out to the day-to-day realities that once again drive our attention away from the things we long to achieve or transform within ourselves.

It’s little surprise, then, that soon after the start of this upcoming new year, many of us will be left feeling as if those plans and goals we set for ourselves to achieve were simply an adult version of calling out “do-over!”, hoping that the chance to start over will somehow lead us to a better reality than the one we have right now.

Of course, it’s not just the end of one year and the impending arrival of a new one that stirs such sentiments and perceptions.

In working and talking with leaders across Canada and the US, it was clear that one thing they shared in common was that feeling of being caught in a perpetual loop where progress is simply defined by getting things done instead of by making a tangible difference, both for their organization and in the lives of those under their care.

Unfortunately, this feeling has left many leaders questioning not only their efficacy, but even the value they bring to their organization through their leadership. Of whether this is all that there is for them offer to those they lead.

Granted, it’s a good thing that these leaders are willing to openly express that frustration because it means that they know they can and should expect more from themselves; of what they can inspire, empower, and provide through their leadership.

But it also illustrates the importance of using milestone moments like the impending start of a new year to Click here to continue reading »”Where Do We Go From Here?”

Why Vacations Are Critical For Successful Leadership

Successful-leadership-and-taking-vacations

With the welcome arrival of the warm summer months, many of us – myself included – are eagerly making final plans for our vacation break and with it, some much needed time for rest and relaxation.

Of course, taking any time off work these days can be quite challenging if not difficult for the very reasons why we need to take these much needed breaks from our everyday workday lives. Namely, the faster-paced, increasing demands on our time, energy, and finite resources that we all have to manage as members of the modern workforce.

These rising demands – not to mention how quickly things can change in the span of a few weeks – can make it very tempting for leaders to pull back on the amount of time they take off from work in order to keep a finger on their organization’s pulse.

While this might address our concerns (and fears) over the short-term, the reality is that it will have a far greater impact on our long-term success as a leader of our team or organization.

To that end, as I make preparations for my vacation break, I’d like to share the following benefits that taking a vacation has on our ability to be successful in our leadership.

1. Vacation breaks give us the opportunity for reflection and review
When I ask some of the leaders I’ve worked with what tasks they’d like to spend more of their workday on, more often than not one of the answers they give is spending more time on ‘big-picture thinking’; of putting their energies and focus on examining the realities and challenges their organization currently faces, and what opportunities this might present going forward.

Of course, this answer is not too surprising as many studies have shown that business leaders around the world would like to be able to spend more time on big-picture thinking.

The key challenge, however, is that thanks to today’s 24/7 wired world, leaders now face ever-growing demands on their time, energy, and attention, a situation that makes having time for pondering the longer view seem more like a luxury than a critical element for leading today’s organizations.

And yet, the reality of leadership today is that leaders need to provide context for what their employees’ efforts today will create for tomorrow [Twitter-logo-smallShare on Twitter]. That to keep their employees engaged and invested in what they contribute today requires an understanding of what this will lead them towards over the long run.

And this is where taking vacation time become so critical to our ability to succeed at leadership Click here to continue reading »”Why Vacations Are Critical For Successful Leadership”

« Older Entries