Tanveer Naseer

Leadership Coach, Speaker, and Writer

3 Keys For Building Relationships With Those You Lead

A leader's ability to build relationships with their employees is fast becoming a critical key to their success. Learn about 3 strategies that will help you build relationships with those you lead.

For almost 10 years, I’ve been writing about leadership and in that time, perhaps one of the most significant shifts I’ve seen has been the willingness to recognize that the key to our success as leaders stems from the relationships we foster and nurture with those we lead.

That we no longer view employees through the lens of Fredrick Taylor’s scientific approach to management – where people are merely assets, and interactions are transactional in nature.

Aside from notions of this being the ‘right thing to do’, this shift from transactional to relationship-based leadership has been proven to create tangible benefits – if not also a competitive edge – for today’s organizations.

In fact, a recent study by Harvard researchers found that when leaders focus on building relationships with their employees, they create conditions that lead to higher levels of organizational commitment, as well as increased employee accountability for their performance and greater satisfaction with their jobs.

This is one of the reasons why I’m looking forward to speaking at the Totem Summit in Whistler, British Columbia later this month because the goal of this conference is building relationships. Specifically, the majority of the conference day involves participating in outdoor activities to allow attendees to interact and engage with the invited guests and speakers. It’s only at the end of the day that attendees will hear speakers like myself share our insights and advice.

This shift in focus in how conferences are designed reflects the current reality in today’s workplaces. Namely, that our ability to succeed and thrive is not simply predicated by the knowledge and skills we’ve accrued, but also by the relationships we seek out to create and build.

Of course, while we might state that building relationships is the key to leadership success, it’s hard to reconcile this truth in the face of today’s faster-paced, ever-changing global environment.

Although we may have access to a greater number of channels through which to communicate and exchange ideas, that doesn’t mean that we’re being effective in creating lasting and meaningful bonds with those around us, and especially with those we lead.

So with that in mind, I’d like to share a few strategies that will help leaders create the proper conditions to truly connect and engage with their employees, and in so doing, provide a workplace environment that engenders greater levels of employee commitment, accountability, and success. Click here to continue reading »”3 Keys For Building Relationships With Those You Lead”

Becoming More Self-Aware To Improve How We Communicate

Self-awareness in how we communicate

No matter what field or industry you work in, one thing that all leaders share in common is the necessity of having an extensive toolkit at their disposal. Of course, while there are various technical skills and aptitudes that are required for leadership positions in various industries, one thing that every leader needs to succeed in their role is to be an effective communicator.

Now in most cases, when it comes to communication, we tend to examine it in the context of our everyday interactions with our employees. However, what’s equally important is understanding how to be an effective communicator when it comes to giving presentations – whether it’s those large presentations like giving the annual company report to employees and/or shareholders, or something on a smaller scale like presenting a proposal to your team or department.

That’s why I reached out to communications expert Scott Schwertly to ask him to share his insights on how we can improve the way we communicate. In this guest piece below, Scott not only reveals the 3 key areas leaders need to address in order to give a great presentation, but also why our sense of self-awareness is so critical to our ability to effectively communicate the message we wish to impart to those we lead.

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After over a decade of analyzing and studying presenters, I have noticed one common error of judgment. What is it?

Most presenters think that yesterday’s presentation will save them today. Reality check: Great presenters have the mindset of a great Sales Manager. They understand that presentation success isn’t about how they were in front of a room last week or last month. Instead, it’s about being in the present. Just ask the Sales Manager. It’s not about what you did for him/her last year or last month. They want to know how you are closing deals right now.

So, write this down or put this to memory: Click here to continue reading »”Becoming More Self-Aware To Improve How We Communicate”

7 Steps To Foster Emotional Intelligence In Your Team

Discover 7 steps that leaders can take to develop and strengthen emotional intelligence among the employees they lead.

The following is a guest piece by John Rampton on behalf of The Economist Executive Education Navigator.

When Daniel Goleman released “Emotional Intelligence” in 1995, did anyone think that this best-selling book would transform the role of leadership?

After selling more than 5,000,000 copies and being dubbed “a revolutionary, paradigm-shattering idea” by the Harvard Business Review, it’s clear that Goleman struck a chord with business leaders.  But, is it possible to create emotionally intelligent teams?

In their landmark research findings published in “Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups”, Vanessa Urch Druskat and Steven B. Wolff assert that emotional intelligence underlies the effective processes of successful teams and that such resulting processes cannot be imitated; they must originate from genuine emotional intelligence at the team level.

Druskat and Wolff use the following analogy to back-up their point: “a piano student can be taught to play Minuet in G, but he won’t become a modern-day Bach without knowing music theory and being able to play with heart.”

While creating successful teams isn’t as simple as mimicking the processes of emotionally intelligent groups of people, what you can do is create the necessary conditions in which team members can develop their emotional intelligence. Those three conditions are: trust among members, a sense of group identity and a sense of group efficacy.

Here are the seven things you can do to foster these three conditions that constitute emotionally intelligent teams: Click here to continue reading »”7 Steps To Foster Emotional Intelligence In Your Team”

Don’t Settle For Being A Good Leader. Be A Real Leader

What-it-takes-to-be-real-leader

The following is a guest piece by former Primerica co-CEO John Addison.

If you look around the world today, you’ll notice something is lacking: real leadership. That’s not a political statement; it’s an across the board statement. You see it every time a corporate CEO gets indicted, or a teacher gets arrested for inappropriate relationships with students and yes, you see it when politicians start behaving badly.

Real leadership is our most scarce commodity, much more so than oil, land or cash, and it’s one we need to focus on growing and preserving in order to improve things now and for future generations.

In my book, “Real Leadership”, I share the nine principles I learned during my almost three decades rising through the leadership ranks at Primerica. They are common sense, doable leadership principles anyone, regardless of their leadership title (or lack of) can easily implement but tend to overlook. The time to stop overlooking them and change the tide of leadership is now. Click here to continue reading »”Don’t Settle For Being A Good Leader. Be A Real Leader”

Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #17 – Whitney Johnson On Using Disruptive Innovation To Drive Growth

Whitney-Johnson-Leadership-Biz-Cafe

When it comes to disruptive innovation, the common and natural tendency is to view it from the lens of organizational growth and evolution. But can the power of disruptive innovation also be applied at the individual level to drive personal success and growth, and if so, how exactly do we go about doing that? It’s the question that serves as the guiding focus of my talk with management thinker, writer, and author, Whitney Johnson.

Whitney is the co-founder of Rose Park Advisors, an investment firm she co-founded with renowned innovation thinker Clayton Christensen. She’s also a former award-winning Wall Street analyst and this year she was a finalist in the Best in Talent Category for the Management Thinkers50.

In addition to writing for the Harvard Business Review and LinkedInfluencer, Whitney’s work has been featured in Fast Company, BBC, CNN, The Guardian, and several other media outlets.

Whitney is also the author of two books, the first being “Dare, Dream, Do” and her latest being “Disrupt Yourself: Putting the Power of Disruptive Innovation to Work”, which is also the focus of this episode’s discussion.

Over the course of this episode, Whitney and I touch on a number of fascinating and personal insights that she shares in her latest book, including: Click here to continue reading »”Leadership Biz Cafe Podcast #17 – Whitney Johnson On Using Disruptive Innovation To Drive Growth”

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